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Metaquatic

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  1. Metaquatic

    deceased bird on Cape Cod

    Thanks for your replies.
  2. Metaquatic

    deceased bird on Cape Cod

    Yellow wedge beak like a grosbeak or finch.
  3. Possibly Scaley-breasted Munia or "Nutmeg Finch" in the pet shop. Invasive pets that got loose and are taking over.
  4. Bird found near the dunes 12/31/18 in wetlands with lots of common reed (Phragmites australis). Many Black-capped Chickadees, Robins, Blue Jay nearby.
  5. Metaquatic

    Female Painted Buntings

    Females are effectionately called "greenies." Honestly the third bird with the more yellowish breast is probably a juvi male. The behavior of the females seems to be more suspicious with their necks stuck out looking around. They act and posture a lot like female House Finches. The males just pose more confident like the bird in the 3rd pic.
  6. Metaquatic

    Female Painted Buntings

    Yes. Female Painted Bunting. My sister in Central Florida has several through the winter.
  7. Metaquatic

    Help with ID - East Texas

    Female Red-winged Blackbird
  8. Metaquatic

    Weirdness in Maryland

    American Goldfinch? It's hard to tell the size in the photo.
  9. Metaquatic

    Eastern Wood-Pewee call?

    I don't think this is any kind of bird at all. It may be a mash up of "bird sounds." I think I hear a little American Goldfinch but nothing that sounds like an Eastern Wood-Pewee. Television/media is notorious for adding bird sounds without giving much thought into it. If you watch a Western and you see a shot of a Vulture or even an Eagle you will hear the classic song of a Red-tailed Hawk. My favorite is the bird sounds the piped into golf tournaments. If the PGA doesn't do any research on what birds might be heard on a Hawaiian golf course, why should anyone care about background birdsong in a fantasy video game. At least the Hunger Games got creative with their "Mockingjay."
  10. High, low, high low sounds like Carolina Chickadee. A similar High, low, low, low and sometimes Low, high, high, high is a White-throated Sparrow. Try these websites and click on the Listen button. Make sure you are listening to the SONG not the CALL! https://ebird.org/species/carchi https://ebird.org/species/whtspa/ Stay Curious!
  11. No yellow on the lores but that is not always apparent.
  12. Lots of sparrows in this 40 acre preserve. This one was kind of light and I thought a possible Lincoln's Sparrow. What do you say?
  13. If I understand this radar correctly, there are many birds moving North across Texas in October. Is this normal? I didn't see anything in the Gulf that looked like it would drive them North. Here is a link from Birdcast. http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/ Thanks for you comments.
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