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sfinmt

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  1. I think all Lessers. That middle bird in the first photo isn't "cheeky" enough for Greater - and in the last photo the same bird has a peaked head.
  2. Boldly-spotted undertail coverts. White corners on broad tail. Yeah...Robin looks good to me, but I might be missing something.
  3. What about Alder here? Hint of eyering - more so than what I might expect on Willow. The broad tail seems to rule out Least.
  4. The tail pattern fits into the array of light-morph Harlan's, but the rest of the bird appears dark-morph Western. Perhaps this an intergrade Western/Harlan's.
  5. I am thinking a first-cycle Thayer's would have an all-back bill and I would expect more defined lighter edges to the primary tips. This is has a first-cycle Herring vibe to me. Spotty scapulars, inner primary window, and the pale mucky bill base. See what others think.
  6. The thin crisp streaks on the breast and lack of any UTC markings are leaning to juvi COHA for me.
  7. I see strong barring on the greater coverts which suggests AMWI. EUWI coverts would have dark centers with weak bars. On my computer screen the head looks quite gray.
  8. I see wide and fairly blurry chest markings, along with some barring on the flanks, and fairly even-length retrices - - all pointing me to SSHA.
  9. Merlin and Red-tailed Hawk are correct.
  10. A dark-morph harlani would typically appear quite black, and usually variably streaked with white. I see nothing in these photos that decidedly moves to Harlan's. Perhaps then just a dark or intermediate morph calurus.
  11. I think your oranger-billed photo may be Z.l. gambelii, unless it's a yellow bill stained orange by fruit? The yellower-billed photos appear to be Z.l.nuttalli.
  12. Yes. You'll often find their tails described as fan-shaped (crow) or wedge-shaped (raven). Most field guides note this.
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