Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Critter time..


Seattle
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 3 weeks later...
27 minutes ago, Seanbirds said:

Went to Quivira NWR Sunday! Birding was a bit slower than we were expecting (especially shorebirds), but the other animals definitely made up for it!

Gophersnake.thumb.JPG.d63d1b338418f7bdf4a7138ed486e41d.JPG

That’s an awesome photo!

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Aaron said:

That’s an awesome photo!

Thanks. I took that with my birding pal’s top-of-the-line 100mm macro lens. That (and the fact that I was laying on my stomach to get at eye level) is why it’s so good. Anybody want to see some more snakes I saw that day?

Edited by Seanbirds
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Seanbirds said:

Thanks. I took that with my birding pal’s top-of-the-line 100mm macro lens. That (and the fact that I was laying on my stomach to get at eye level) is why it’s so good. Anybody want to see some more snakes I saw that day?

Definitely! The snakes around Sacramento are very uncooperative. I'm lucky to see one every fifteen trips.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Seanbirds said:

Went to Quivira NWR Sunday! Birding was a bit slower than we were expecting (especially shorebirds), but the other animals definitely made up for it!

Gophersnake.thumb.JPG.d63d1b338418f7bdf4a7138ed486e41d.JPG

Is this a Gopher/Bullsnake doing a Rattlesnake impression? If yes you should put it in the Blending....Mimic thread too. This is an excellent example.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Clip said:

Is this a Gopher/Bullsnake doing a Rattlesnake impression? If yes you should put it in the Blending....Mimic thread too. This is an excellent example.

I think so. It was coiling and hissing loudly, but it never struck. 
An interesting thing I’ve found out about most snakes is that their tail vibrates when they are disturbed, whether venomous or no. Rattlesnakes have rattles that make noise when they are disturbed, as we all know. But my hypothesis is that they aren’t trying to warn you of their presence, it’s just instinct. 

Edited by Seanbirds
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Connor Cochrane said:

I guess you were feeling a little risky. The only times I've gotten that close is when I've ran over them Mountain Biking.

True, we probably did get too close. However, this is the smallest and most mild-mannered Rattlesnake in Kansas, so I don’t think we were in too much danger, if any at all. I would definitely give one your California rattlesnakes (like a Western Diamondback) a lot more room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Seanbirds said:

I think so. It was coiling and hissing loudly, but it never struck. 
An interesting thing I’ve found out about most snakes is that their tail vibrates when they are disturbed, whether venomous or no. Rattlesnakes have rattles that make noise when they are disturbed, as we all know. But my hypothesis is that they aren’t trying to warn you of their presence, it’s just instinct. 

It is a defense mechanism. They want you to think they can harm you if you do not retreat and leave them alone. Like the Bull Snake below trying to make it's head look more like a Rattlesnake head.

027.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Seanbirds said:

Oh yes, a word about taxonomy. Gophersnake is the species. Bullsnake is one of the most common subspecies.

What other Gopher Snakes are there? Do you have photos of any others you can share. I would love to see some.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Clip said:

What other Gopher Snakes are there? Do you have photos of any others you can share. I would love to see some.

Some of the most widespread subspecies include the “Sonoran Gophersnake”, “Great Basin Gophersnake”, and “Pacific Gophersnake”, but there are many more ssp, mainly in California and Baja California.

 

I haven’t seen any other subspecies besides the Bullsnake.

Edited by Seanbirds
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Clip said:

It is a defense mechanism. They want you to think they can harm you if you do not retreat and leave them alone. Like the Bull Snake below trying to make it's head look more like a Rattlesnake head.

027.JPG

Garters and Nerodia watersnakes do that too. Nice photo! Where was this? This may actually be a Sonoran, not a Bullsnake.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, Seanbirds said:

Some of the most widespread subspecies include the “Sonoran Gophersnake”, “Great Basin Gophersnake”, and “Pacific Gophersnake”, but there are many more ssp, mainly in California and Baja California.

 

I haven’t seen any other subspecies besides the Bullsnake.

Cool! I could be wrong but I don't think we get any Gopher Snakes in Florida.? I kind of miss them. Use to see them all the time in Colorado.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...