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Good morning, All.

We had a hummingbird come into the yard this morning that did not act like our usual RTs.  It seemed large, had a louder/buzzier sounding flight, and did not twitter at all, even when close to us.  It seemed confused by the feeder--like he/she did not know what to do.  It did nectar at several flowers.  We thought it might just be a young RT, but it seemed larger.  We occasionally have other species of hummers here.  We could not see features/colors well enough to describe.  

27 June 2020 Baldwin co. AL (coastal)

Edited by floraphile
typo
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1 hour ago, floraphile said:

Good morning, All.

We had a hummingbird come into the yard this morning that did not act like our usual RTs.  It seemed large, had a louder/buzzier sounding flight, and did not twitter at all, even when close to us.  It seemed confused by the feeder--like he/she did not know what to do.  It did nectar at several flowers.  We thought it might just be a young RT, but it seemed larger.  We occasionally have other species of hummers here.  We could not see features/colors well enough to describe.  

27 June 2020 Baldwin co. AL (coastal)

 Keep an eye out to see if you can spot it again. When I have hummers close by that I see every day I can tell the different species by their wing sounds. 

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On 6/27/2020 at 1:00 PM, Aveschapines said:

 Keep an eye out to see if you can spot it again. When I have hummers close by that I see every day I can tell the different species by their wing sounds. 

We had never observed a hummingbird that didn't constantly twitter, and it was so confused about the feeder.

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It is very helpful to learn wing trills of Hummingbirds. Here in California, we have many different species of Hummingbirds, and they can often be narrowed down to species just by their wing trills. Most Hummingbirds I often don’t see, I only hear them, and it’s normally just the wing trills, not them vocalizing. If you live in the western US, I recommend learning Hummingbirds wing trills. 

Edited by Connor Cochrane
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9 hours ago, Connor Cochrane said:

It is very helpful to learn wing trills of Hummingbirds. Here in California, we have many different species of Hummingbirds, and they can often be narrowed down to species just by their wing trills. Most Hummingbirds I often don’t see, I only hear them, and it’s normally just the wing trills, not them vocalizing. If you live in the western US, I recommend learning Hummingbirds wing trills. 

You too.  :classic_angry:

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On 6/27/2020 at 3:10 PM, Charlie Spencer said:

I hate you.  :classic_angry:

 

On 6/29/2020 at 6:53 AM, Charlie Spencer said:

You too.  :classic_angry:

I guess I am about to be on the list.

Black-chinned and Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are both common here, so identifying them by there wing sounds is very helpful.

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12 minutes ago, Kevin said:

 

I guess I am about to be on the list.

Black-chinned and Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are both common here, so identifying them by there wing sounds is very helpful.

Well, I've hated you for a while now.  Nothing new about that.  :classic_tongue:

Seriously, all I've been exposed to are Ruby-Throateds.  It never occurred to me the buzz would vary between species.

Edited by Charlie Spencer
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2 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Well, I've hated you for a while now.  Nothing new about that.  :classic_tongue:

Seriously, all I've been exposed to are Ruby-Throateds.  It never occurred to me the buzz would vary between species.

Same about the hummingbirds. The burden of the Northeast

Edited by Avery
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8 hours ago, Colton V said:

I read somewhere that the chirp at the bottom of an Anna’s hummingbird dive is caused by vibration of tail feathers and not the hummingbird’s voice

Definitely made by something other than that pipsqueak's voice box - especially inches from my ear :classic_angry:  :classic_laugh:

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2 hours ago, Aveschapines said:

Let's stop the hate! If you are close to multiple species on a daily basis you learn to distinguish the sound of their wing beats. Exposure and spending time together leads to mutual understanding 😄

"I'd like to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony, I'd like to hold it in my arms and keep it company!"

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On 6/28/2020 at 9:42 PM, Aveschapines said:

By twitter, do you mean chirp/vocalize? The ones I see certainly can be noisy but don't always chirp. 

Yes--vocalize.  I think it's pretty amazing many of you can ID hummingbirds via voice and wing beats/sounds.

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