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7 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

Cooper's Hawk is correct for the reasons you mentioned plus the relatively small eye that is closer to the front of the head, the blocky head, and light gray nape.

Thank-you for the confirmation and the additional characteristics to look for.

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5 hours ago, hbvol50 said:

I was just thinking that, given the size of the rat, that it's a female

I'm not entirely sure what you mean here. In Accipiters (and perhaps most raptors, although I'm not sure) the female is actually much (~20%) larger than the male. Perhaps a typo?

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39 minutes ago, Benjamin said:

I'm not entirely sure what you mean here. In Accipiters (and perhaps most raptors, although I'm not sure) the female is actually much (~20%) larger than the male. Perhaps a typo?

What we mean is that a male would be too small to carry a rat that big up on a roof.

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1 hour ago, Benjamin said:

I'm not entirely sure what you mean here. In Accipiters (and perhaps most raptors, although I'm not sure) the female is actually much (~20%) larger than the male. Perhaps a typo?

I mean it's likely that only a female Coop would take this large prey

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You cannot determine the size of the rat, so you cannot determine the size of the bird. Rat's are exceedingly variable in size. I'd guess it's a male from the relatively straight-ish tail tip on a fairly short tail for the species. Females have longer tails that tend to be rounder. Please note the many qualifiers.

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30 minutes ago, Tony Leukering said:

You cannot determine the size of the rat, so you cannot determine the size of the bird. Rat's are exceedingly variable in size. I'd guess it's a male from the relatively straight-ish tail tip on a fairly short tail for the species. Females have longer tails that tend to be rounder. Please note the many qualifiers.

Those rectangular sections, or "tabs" of the shingles on the roof should measure 12" wide.  So we could estimate the size of the rat (or the hawk).  If we wanted to.

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9 hours ago, twitchy said:

Those rectangular sections, or "tabs" of the shingles on the roof should measure 12" wide.  So we could estimate the size of the rat (or the hawk).  If we wanted to.

That, and that's just a big rat in proportion to the bird.  Regardless of gender, I'm surprised any Cooper's could lift prey that appears to be roughly half the bird's body length.  They must be stronger than I give them credit.

Edited by Charlie Spencer
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