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The "Other" things you see when Birding


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Opossum-did you know that the opossum is North America's only marsupial? After a very short time 10-13 days in Mom's womb the babies climb into mom's pouch. They are so tiny that 20 can fit into a teaspoon. Once they get too big for Mom's pouch they ride on her back until they are able to fend for themselves. The life expectancy for a Opossum is only 1 to 2 years because of natural predators and being run over by cars. ūüė≠ They should be a welcome addition to any neighborhood as they eat many of the things we humans don't want around our homes like mice, rats, roaches...The photo below is from our backyard. We welcomed them until they started eating all the bird food and getting into our propane BBQ grill. We then discouraged it coming around only by making it impossible for them to eat the bird food and cleaning the drip pan on the BBQ after each use. We still see one onces in awhile.

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On 2/21/2022 at 7:28 PM, lonestranger said:

The news story I posted in the Birding News forum speculates that the birds were trying to avoid a predator from above. Theory is that the upper birds in the flock tried to evade a predator and ultimately drove the lower birds into the ground.

Is there footage of the area after the flock leaves? those that died are easy picking for the predator

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On 2/22/2022 at 3:10 AM, Clip said:

@Aidan BIs this a Scad too? If yes can you tell which kind? If not can you tell what it is? The photo was taken on the beach in Nassau County, FL. Which as far North and east as you can go and still be on land in Florida. I'm not sure if the fish was caught close to shore or not. August 2021

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This here is a very young Crevalle Jack. Not certain I can ID the ray, but it's probably a Bluntnose Ray. I've never done anything with IDing crabs, but I do know a couple of the common species. Go ahead and post the seahorse, there's only three species in florida so I should hopefully get it.  

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29 minutes ago, MacMe said:

Is there footage of the area after the flock leaves? those that died are easy picking for the predator

If there's more footage, I haven't seen it. There's a good chance that the predator found a meal while the birds were still in the air, eliminating any need to visit the dead birds on the ground. That's pure speculation though, as is the predator theory.

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Pale-striped Poison Dart Frog

After doing some research later, I'm very glad I had the sense not to touch this tiny frog. It is from a family of very poisonous frogs. It's 'cousin' the Golden Poison Dart Frog, on average is generally estimated to contain about one milligram of poison, enough to kill between 10 to 20 humans, or up to two African bull elephants! --source: Wikipedia--

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/107477451

original.jpeg

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21 minutes ago, Jefferson Shank said:

Pale-striped Poison Dart Frog

After doing some research later, I'm very glad I had the sense not to touch this tiny frog. It is from a family of very poisonous frogs. It's 'cousin' the Golden Poison Dart Frog, on average is generally estimated to contain about one milligram of poison, enough to kill between 10 to 20 humans, or up to two African bull elephants! --source: Wikipedia--

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/107477451

original.jpeg

I never try to touch any wild creature for this reason.

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2 hours ago, Clip said:

Interesting! Did you catch it midair or is hanging on a spider web?

A single strand of  web but it was a bit difficult with the wind that day spinning it around

Edited by Johnd
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On 2/26/2022 at 8:36 AM, Jefferson Shank said:

the Golden Poison Dart Frog, on average is generally estimated to contain about one milligram of poison, enough to kill between 10 to 20 humans, or up to two African bull elephants!

What predator are they defending against?  A toxin such as this seems specialized for one specific predator.  A biological arms race between two species leaves all others in the dust

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18 hours ago, Aidan B said:

Thanks, that was helpful. It's a Lined Seahorse by location. 

Sorry about that. I had been doing so well adding location. So are you tired of my fish yet? If you are I can try to do them myself if you point me in the direction of a good source.

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