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Yes, this is a raven. The diamond-shaped tail rules out a crow.

The exact place where you found this in northern New Mexico would help to rule out a Chihuahuan Raven.

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3 hours ago, akandula said:

Yes, this is a raven. The diamond-shaped tail rules out a crow.

The exact place where you found this in northern New Mexico would help to rule out a Chihuahuan Raven.

It was near Questa. Where the Red River and the Rio Grande converge. 

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Posted (edited)

It’s very tricky to separate ravens, probably one of the more underrated ID challenges. Voice is your best bet, although size, length of nasal bristles, and other characteristics can be used. 

Edited by Phalarope713
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Posted (edited)

Yeah in my experience it's pretty much impossible to distinguish in the field except through range and voice. If seen exceptionally well and in very close range nasal bristles can be used, but I've never even had the chance to use that in the field before.

Edited by Benjamin
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On 8/4/2020 at 9:40 AM, Phalarope713 said:

It’s very tricky to separate ravens, probably one of the more underrated ID challenges. Voice is your best bet, although size, length of nasal bristles, and other characteristics can be used. 

Ravens are smart. They say lots of things. In different ways. Juvenile ravens have higher-pitched voices than do adult ravens. Voice is not reliable as a differentiator without a LOT of experience actually listening to them. Well, except for that really deep, long croak typical of Common.

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1 hour ago, Tony Leukering said:

Ravens are smart. They say lots of things. In different ways. Juvenile ravens have higher-pitched voices than do adult ravens. Voice is not reliable as a differentiator without a LOT of experience actually listening to them. Well, except for that really deep, long croak typical of Common.

Good point, that is absolutely correct. I've mistook juvenile Commons for Chihuahuans on multiple occasions.

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