Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Recommended Posts

1 The right bird is a Chipping sparrow, not sure about the left one.

2 Brewer's Sparrow I think.

3 Red-bellied Woodpecker.

4 Pinyon Jay.

5-6 House Finch.

7-8 Pass. (For now.)

9 Western Bluebird. (I think.)

10-11 Lazuli Bunting.

12 Say's Phoebe.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A few corrections-

#1 the left bird appears to be a juvenile Chipping Sparrow

#2 is a Lark Sparrow, notice the sturdier structure and white on the underside of the tail

#3 is a female/immature Williamson's Sapsucker- no other NA woodpecker is so evenly and plainly barred over the entire body. Red-bellied of course does not live in NM

#8 is a Broad-tailed Hummingbird with that buffy coloration and elongated structure

Edited by Benjamin
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Benjamin said:

A few corrections-

#1 the left bird appears to be a juvenile Chipping Sparrow

#2 is a Lark Sparrow, notice the sturdier structure and white on the underside of the tail

#3 is a female/immature Williamson's Sapsucker- no other NA woodpecker is so evenly and plainly barred over the entire body. Red-bellied of course does not live in NM

#8 is a Broad-tailed Hummingbird with that buffy coloration and elongated structure

I thought the first one might be a Chipping Sparrow but I didn't want to say that and be wrong.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Kevin said:

I thought the first one might be a Chipping Sparrow but I didn't want to say that and be wrong.

Dark lores + bright wings = Chipping. And, of course, it's right next to an adult Chipping perching in a habitat in which I would not expect Brewer's, which likes a brushy desert landscape.

Edited by Benjamin
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, The Bird Nuts said:

Isn't the bird in the second photo also a Chipping?  The eyeline doesn't curve downward like a Lark Sparrow's and its beak is small and very pink.

It makes me feel better to know that one of two better birders also has misidentified it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

For those still stuck on the second bird, notice the brownish nape as opposed to a grayish on Chipping. And again, I'll point you to notice the tail pattern. @blackburnian, good catch on the Jay. 

@Kevin, I totally know that feeling- it's honestly just a lot of practice and experience. Doesn't mean that I, or anybody else can't get these wrong- so just stick with it and keep sharpening your skills, and don't be afraid to bring new ideas to the table, even if it's not what the 'better birders' are saying! If it's not clear to you why an ID is correct or incorrect, then it's probably not clear to someone else too! So taking the time to explain how I, or anybody else arrives at that ID will help everyone learn, even me.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Benjamin said:

For those still stuck on the second bird, notice the brownish nape as opposed to a grayish on Chipping. And again, I'll point you to notice the tail pattern.

Ah, thanks!  I missed your first explanation.  Sorry about that.  I obviously don't have much experience with Lark Sparrows.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Kevin said:

It makes me feel better to know that one of two better birders also has misidentified it.

I only asked if it was also a Chipping!.............................................................okay, I misidentified it..........😳😳

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Benjamin said:

#3 is a female/immature Williamson's Sapsucker

Juvenile male Williamson's Sapsuckers are black, like the adults.

 

17 hours ago, blackburnian said:

Also there’s no Pinyon Jay. The Jay is a Scrub.

In drabbish blue jays east of the Sierras:

Long bill, short tail = Pinyon

Short bill, long tail = Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Kind of surprised the hummingbird's ID is still being discussed.  No other species in that area has a tail that long in proportion to the body (certainly not Black-chinned) hence it's a Broad-tailed Hummingbird.

Edited by Benjamin
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...