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Shorebird irregulars


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Coastal socal flood channel wash - lately lots of WESA and LESA, with other types showing up irregularly.

Recent evening I saw several irregulars I hadn't seen before so I'm working through them.

1a. Pectoral or Baird's? Blurry shot next to a WESA to show size/shape:
1896615939_SIZEpectoralorbairdsleftWESAright.thumb.JPG.1bf310ffc50267b37773119f760b01e9.JPG

1b. Same (I think) Pectoral/Baird's but with a LESA or Sanderling in front:

216927934_pectbacksanderfrontzoom.thumb.JPG.243223196253ed145172bd8064e7cc02.JPG

 

2. Sanderlings? Or just scrunched up LESAs (i think the gray tone in the photos is exaggerated)

1333941181_sanderlingmaybe.thumb.JPG.19d7428c43718d27491d8243a89fb863.JPG

3a. Phalarope/Dunlin/Rock Sandpiper no idea

1875394926_phalaropedunlinzoom.thumb.jpg.d635a37a81d05077bd70dadba64259fc.jpg

3b. Phalarope/Dunlin/Rock Sandpiper no idea

220113220_phalaropedunlin2zoom.thumb.jpg.0d000ad280a18f8370d3eda7b52f9cf8.jpg

4. Looks like a blocky WESA:

1433390962_blockywesa.thumb.JPG.626c4bdc0d5e4aed384c053e7310d7a6.JPG

Edited by Soohegan
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It's really hard to say much without better photos, but a few things.

1) Pectoral and Western/Semi

2) Pectoral in back, I don't think the bird in front is identifiable

3) All Leasts

4) Very difficult to tell, but I like Least for both birds

5) Possibly Leasts, but essentially unidentifiable

6) Yes, Western

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40 minutes ago, Benjamin said:

It's really hard to say much without better photos, but a few things.

1) Pectoral and Western/Semi

2) Pectoral in back, I don't think the bird in front is identifiable

3) All Leasts

4) Very difficult to tell, but I like Least for both birds

5) Possibly Leasts, but essentially unidentifiable

6) Yes, Western

Thanks!

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On 8/27/2020 at 4:29 PM, Tony Leukering said:

The birds in #1 and #2 have yellow legs and white braces, respectively, which means either Least or Pectoral, and I'd go for Pec for both.

In #3, it's pretty safe to rule out Rock Sand on a) the habitat and b) SoCal.

I've been told that this cannot be pectoral (must have a dark wash across chest, needs longer neck/taller stance).

I'm trying to find other photos from subsequent days.

The only thing I haven't ruled out is a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper. They are extremely rare around here but there are fairly recent records up into LA county.

In other words I need new candidates to evaluate since SHSA is so improbable.

Edited by Soohegan
improbable
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I don't know from whom you're getting this information, but it's interesting that Sharp-tailed Sandpiper is a possibility in your mind while Pectoral is not. Structurally, these two species are nearly identical, and both have varying levels of streaking on the breast.

The candidates I would suggest you to evaluate would be Least and Pectoral, as these are the NA peeps which have yellow legs. From that, we can deduce from size alone that these must be Pectoral.

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Just now, Benjamin said:

I don't know from whom you're getting this information, but it's interesting that Sharp-tailed Sandpiper is a possibility in your mind while Pectoral is not. Structurally, these two species are nearly identical, and both have varying levels of streaking on the breast.

The candidates I would suggest you to evaluate would be Least and Pectoral, as these are the NA peeps which have yellow legs. From that, we can deduce from size alone that these must be Pectoral.

Pectoral is a very unusual and sporadic migrant along the California coast, with most records of a few birds in Late September. But it’s much more likely here than a sharp tailed. 

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4 minutes ago, Benjamin said:

I don't know from whom you're getting this information, but it's interesting that Sharp-tailed Sandpiper is a possibility in your mind while Pectoral is not. Structurally, these two species are nearly identical, and both have varying levels of streaking on the breast.

The candidates I would suggest you to evaluate would be Least and Pectoral, as these are the NA peeps which have yellow legs. From that, we can deduce from size alone that these must be Pectoral.

Pectoral it is then - thanks

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14 hours ago, Benjamin said:

I don't know from whom you're getting this information, but it's interesting that Sharp-tailed Sandpiper is a possibility in your mind while Pectoral is not. Structurally, these two species are nearly identical, and both have varying levels of streaking on the breast.

The candidates I would suggest you to evaluate would be Least and Pectoral, as these are the NA peeps which have yellow legs. From that, we can deduce from size alone that these must be Pectoral.

"Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth."
- Sherlock Holmes

Stay tuned...

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On 8/29/2020 at 4:35 PM, Benjamin said:

I don't know from whom you're getting this information, but it's interesting that Sharp-tailed Sandpiper is a possibility in your mind while Pectoral is not. Structurally, these two species are nearly identical, and both have varying levels of streaking on the breast.

The candidates I would suggest you to evaluate would be Least and Pectoral, as these are the NA peeps which have yellow legs. From that, we can deduce from size alone that these must be Pectoral.

I don't really have a confirmed ID on this one yet but still going through photos so stay tuned. I really don't understand how you can say it is impossible for it to be a sharpie. It is improbable, and there are vast differences between those words; one means it will not happen, and one means it will. Pecs come by here pretty much every summer, but alas this is not a pec.

One of them is either a Least Sandpiper, or it's a bird that has exactly one record in the (big) state; an absurdly improbable find. This little bird in the picture defied the astronomical odds and decided to come by and hang out for a stint.

Get REKT...

63489416_littleredcorvette.thumb.JPG.e562c33fee3f667658a8db05dfaef815.JPG

 

Edited by Soohegan
duh
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5 minutes ago, Soohegan said:

I don't really have a confirmed ID on this one yet but still going through photos so stay tuned. I really don't understand how you can say it is impossible for it to be a sharpie. It is improbable, and there are vast differences between those words; one means it will not happen, and one means it will. Pecs come by here pretty much every summer, but alas this is not a pec.

One of them is either a Least Sandpiper, or it's a bird that has exactly one record in the (big) state; an absurdly improbable find. This little bird in the picture defied the astronomical odds and decided to come by and hang out for a stint.

Get REKT...

63489416_littleredcorvette.thumb.JPG.e562c33fee3f667658a8db05dfaef815.JPG

 

Why is it not a pec?

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I can't tell if this is a troll, but the way in which you're approaching the subtleties of peep identification is overly reductive and you seem to want to argue every single point ad nauseum.

Pectoral vs Sharp-tailed Sandpiper is not as easy as a single obvious field mark, yet you seem to think it is. But again, this misses the big picture- all three of these birds are Leasts: Pectoral is a very large peep and would dwarf any other Leasts. Finally, notice how the tertials reach the tip of the tail, again indicative of Least.

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9 hours ago, Benjamin said:

I can't tell if this is a troll, but the way in which you're approaching the subtleties of peep identification is overly reductive and you seem to want to argue every single point ad nauseum.

Pectoral vs Sharp-tailed Sandpiper is not as easy as a single obvious field mark, yet you seem to think it is. But again, this misses the big picture- all three of these birds are Leasts: Pectoral is a very large peep and would dwarf any other Leasts. Finally, notice how the tertials reach the tip of the tail, again indicative of Least.

There's that bird community hospitality I've heard so much about! Thanks for welcoming me into the community. You make a lot of assumptions.

This juvenile Long-toed Stint shows a deep "split" supercilia - a very Stinty trait. Also, it's not super clear, but you can see his namesake toe as well.

 

 

 

LTS-juv.jpg

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LESA top and left, LTS right. You wouldn't believe me if I told you what is at center. And you won't be able to tell me what it is, but you'll insist that I provide you with the EKG readout from his medical exam.

Compare the wing coverts - LESA bright rufous, LTS pretty much white.

Compare the scapulars. LTS has wide and straight uppers that continue a LONG way down. That contributes to the clearly defined triangle mantles that stints are known for.

 

LTS LESA side by side.jpg

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21 minutes ago, Soohegan said:

There's that bird community hospitality I've heard so much about! Thanks for welcoming me into the community. You make a lot of assumptions.

This juvenile Long-toed Stint shows a deep "split" supercilia - a very Stinty trait. Also, it's not super clear, but you can see his namesake toe as well.

The split supercilia photo also show the white base of lower mandible and white throat, along with the two long lines of feathers that form the frame of the mantle "triangles".

Edited by Soohegan
triangle
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What do Stints have to do with why the bird isn't a Pectoral?

I'm also curious why you're saying it's not a pec, because it looks good for one to me. Yellow legs, chunky shape, and the photos aren't good enough to see the perfect line on the chest. In any case, I think STSA also have the same line. The shape rules out LESA, and the yellow legs narrows it down to Pec and STSA, which is basically out of range.

Side note: if I considered every rare possibility when birding, I'd never ID anything to species.

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3 hours ago, Melierax said:

What do Stints have to do with why the bird isn't a Pectoral?

I'm also curious why you're saying it's not a pec, because it looks good for one to me. Yellow legs, chunky shape, and the photos aren't good enough to see the perfect line on the chest. In any case, I think STSA also have the same line. The shape rules out LESA, and the yellow legs narrows it down to Pec and STSA, which is basically out of range.

Side note: if I considered every rare possibility when birding, I'd never ID anything to species.

It's not a pec because the size was a camera angle / zoom illusion. It's not as big as it looks.

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9 hours ago, Soohegan said:

Check that... it's a White-rumped Sandpiper (in "pre-basic molt" I think).

Hi.  Remind me, please, which photo you're referring to, its date and location, and which bird if there are multiple birds in the photo.

Your opening post refers to 'socal', which I assume is southern California.  Only two White-rumped Sandpipers have been seen in southern California this century.   I'm not saying it's not possible, but I'd like to know exactly which bird pictured above we're referring to.

Thanks.

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