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Soohegan

Baird's Sandpiper?

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I presume you're talking about the backmost bird, which is a Western. Notice the rufous scapulars, Baird's would never have this

 

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11 hours ago, Tony Leukering said:

Baird's and Least are brown birds, Semi and Western are gray birds.

Ok good way to put it. I still have a lot to learn, since after more research I see Baird's characteristics in the lower right bird in the first photo. Look at the bird on top in the photo below:

bairds-top-crop.thumb.jpg.e7c6e8c656ed103865a0ce2c59607186.jpg

 

- Flat, egg shaped body from front view
- Only buff shades seen on head, face, and neck - no gray streaks, just buff
- Smallish head
- Walking with body parallel to ground giving crouched look
- Thinish, needlelike bill, not particularly that long or sturdy
- Smallish head
- Long black wingtips extend past the end of the tail
- Edge highlights of wing covert feathers are not clean white, rather have buff wash

But it's a Westie... because of one feature. There has to some Baird's in that bird!

Here's another photo of the right side bird in the first post photo. See the crossed wingtips? Doesn't that make it a Baird's?
1695057465_bairdsfrontzoomtailcross.jpg.d7c760efec8f570f6e0bacea322a7284.jpg

 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Soohegan said:

Look at the bird on top in the photo below:

You overlooked the dark legs.  :classic_biggrin:

Edited by Charlie Spencer

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1 hour ago, Charlie Spencer said:

You overlooked the dark legs.  :classic_biggrin:

Baird's has dark legs.

@Soohegan, I once again invite you to notice the rufous scapulars-- this is a classic Western Sandpiper field mark, and it's not something you'd ever see on a Baird's, which are very buffy.

Just in general, Baird's are much, much more buffy overall, where your birds are quite grayish.

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Benjamin said:

Baird's has dark legs.

 

Out of 'Likes' (AGAIN).

I think we're at cross-purposes, or maybe I misunderstood @Soohegan post.  I thought it was a list of the features of the upper right bird in the last photo, and I saw that leg color was apparently missed.

Edited by Charlie Spencer

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1 hour ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Out of 'Likes' (AGAIN).

I think we're at cross-purposes, or maybe I misunderstood @Soohegan post.  I thought it was a list of the features of the upper right bird in the last photo, and I saw that leg color was apparently missed.

Yes sorry I was not clear - the bottom 3 in the first photo and the top one in the second photo appear to have Baird's body shape.

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11 hours ago, Soohegan said:

Pretty good shot of wingtips extending past tail and crossing:1954113459_Bairdswingtipszoom.thumb.jpg.3192a2ad25b6b6ad11d3f87283c875c0.jpg

Aren't the long wing tips diagnostic?

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3 hours ago, Connor Cochrane said:

Western has wings that reach the end of the tail in most positions.  Bairds would never show any rufous on it. 

OK I'll just create my own personal sub-type: Western Sandpiper - "Baird's" type.

It's funny because the reason I came to know this type is by looking for migrating Semipalmated Sandpipers over the last few weeks, mainly by observing WESA/LESA and looking for "WESAs with a somewhat more elegant/balanced shape and a short bill". They would always get eliminated on further inspection because the bill is not straight and/or short enough. So I realized that many of my "thrown away" SESA candidates fit a lot of the description for a Baird's.

I say it's funny that SESA is involved in this because of course on my morning walk what do I find?...617161624_SESAWESAsidebysidezoom.thumb.JPG.631c9b735fbf3bc852e2fe4bb31f6380.JPG

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1 hour ago, Tony Leukering said:

Baird's has a brown hood in all plumages. Well, not the downy plumage of chicks, but all others.

Is it possible that I'm just selecting males out of these WESA flocks (by virtue of looking for small bill) and in the process established other characteristics that distinguish m/f WESA? If we can say males tend to have shorter less sturdy bills, can we also say they tend to have flatter, crouchier bodies? Or slightly longer primaries that appear more exposed when viewed from the side? Etc.

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