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Your checklist of the day!


Kevin

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14 minutes ago, Kevin said:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S127516414

A lovely morning out! First part of the road was really slow, but I got down to another field and there was lots of activity.

Also on the walk back, the sun had started melting all the ice off the trees, so it sounded like rain. The photo doesn't do it justice, it was quite beautiful. 

 

DSCN0846.JPG

Nice checklist!

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1 hour ago, Birds are cool said:

Made two checklists today. I am sick(nasty headache, can barely walk, wicked dry cough), and that hindered my birding. Checklist shows how bad it is. I usually get over 25 species, today my biggest checklist was 9 species.:classic_sad:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S127595148

All that running in the rain and cold.....

Sorry to hear you feel bad, get better soon. 

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49 minutes ago, dragon49 said:

I like to have one big checklist that generally covers a lot of distance

Just letting you know that this is not the type of lists that eBird wants. A single list for a single location(hotspot) is fine, but 9 mile or so walks are recommended to be only one list.

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3 hours ago, IKLland said:

Just letting you know that this is not the type of lists that eBird wants. A single list for a single location(hotspot) is fine, but 9 mile or so walks are recommended to be only one list.

I don't understand your point.  When I go on > 9-mile walks, I only submit one checklist for that hike.  Also, I'm always at the same hotspot when I go on those long birding walks, and as the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is HUGE, I never leave the refuge during those trips, so submitting it to the generically named Loxahatchee NWR hotspot is accurate.  So, please elaborate.

Edited by dragon49
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54 minutes ago, dragon49 said:

I don't understand your point.  When I go on > 9-mile walks, I only submit one checklist for that hike.  Also, I'm always at the same hotspot when I go on those long birding walks, and as the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is HUGE, I never leave the refuge during those trips, so submitting it to the generically named Loxahatchee NWR hotspot is accurate.  So, please elaborate.

The longer the distance covered in a checklist, the less-valuable the data is. Remember, the point of eBird is for scientific data. 
 

If there are more specific hotspots for the area that you visit at the wildlife refuge, I’d suggest doing a different list for each section you visit that had a hotspot for it. If there’s not a hotspot for the different sections, then I guess you can do what you’re doing with the checklist, but perhaps doing one list for the way to the destination, and then one for the return walk would be preferable? 
 

But the bottom line is that if there’s a way to make your data more valuable based on shortening distances for checklists and/or using the most specific hotspots available, you should do so. 

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48 minutes ago, IKLland said:

but perhaps doing one list for the way to the destination, and then one for the return walk would be preferable? 
 

I get everything you said, and I do want to be the best citizen scientist I can be, so I always strive to adhere to Ebird's best practices.  I deleted all of the quoted text, except for part of a sentence to clear one thing up:

On these long walks, I only go in one direction - there is no return trip.  Once I reach civilization at the destination, I take an Uber back to the parking lot where I started.  My walking pace is slow when birding and photographing, and I don't have the daylight to make it back.  I also have no interest in 18–26-mile walks (I'd have to carry 2X the water and associated weight as well) - 9-13 is good enough. 🙂 

Regarding return trips, it may make sense for a separate checklist when I do take them on shorter walks.  It would help me out also, as It's always frustrating to have to figure out what birds to count on the way back.  I always prefer to underreport rather than overreport, so I'm very conservative in reporting birds on the way back.  In any event, separate checklists for return trips is a very interesting subject to discuss.   I don't see any birders in my county doing that though.  They just put in their notes that distance was adjusted for backtracking.

Edited by dragon49
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6 hours ago, dragon49 said:

My walking pace is slow when birding and photographing,

AMEN!!!

6 hours ago, dragon49 said:

Regarding return trips, it may make sense for a separate checklist when I do take them on shorter walks.  It would help me out also, as It's always frustrating to have to figure out what birds to count on the way back.  I always prefer to underreport rather than overreport, so I'm very conservative in reporting birds on the way back.  In any event, separate checklists for return trips is a very interesting subject to discuss.   I don't see any birders in my county doing that though.  They just put in their notes that distance was adjusted for backtracking.

I tend to do separate checklists for there and back.

But while we’re here: What do you do if you end a checklist hearing/seeing birds, and start another while hearing/seeing those same birds. Do you count them if you counted them in the previous checklist?

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8 hours ago, dragon49 said:

I get everything you said, and I do want to be the best citizen scientist I can be, so I always strive to adhere to Ebird's best practices.  I deleted all of the quoted text, except for part of a sentence to clear one thing up:

On these long walks, I only go in one direction - there is no return trip.  Once I reach civilization at the destination, I take an Uber back to the parking lot where I started.  My walking pace is slow when birding and photographing, and I don't have the daylight to make it back.  I also have no interest in 18–26-mile walks (I'd have to carry 2X the water and associated weight as well) - 9-13 is good enough. 🙂 

Regarding return trips, it may make sense for a separate checklist when I do take them on shorter walks.  It would help me out also, as It's always frustrating to have to figure out what birds to count on the way back.  I always prefer to underreport rather than overreport, so I'm very conservative in reporting birds on the way back.  In any event, separate checklists for return trips is a very interesting subject to discuss.   I don't see any birders in my county doing that though.  They just put in their notes that distance was adjusted for backtracking.

I don’t think return trip checklists are necessary for short walks. If your only doing like 3 miles one-way, you can do the same list for the way back. Just subtract the distance you walked on your return trip and enter that as the mileage on the checklist. 
 

Since you’re actually not waking both ways on those long walks, then you don’t have to worry about a return trip checklist. 

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2 hours ago, Snake Fingers said:

But while we’re here: What do you do if you end a checklist hearing/seeing birds, and start another while hearing/seeing those same birds. Do you count them if you counted them in the previous checklist?

This is exactly why I avoid doing return trip checklists for walks under 5 miles one-way. If you submit it twice(even if it’s the same bird), then that’s can lead to incorrect data because eBird thinks there were more of the birds. 

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4 hours ago, Snake Fingers said:

But while we’re here: What do you do if you end a checklist hearing/seeing birds, and start another while hearing/seeing those same birds. Do you count them if you counted them in the previous checklist?

I run into this, and I do count the birds again.  For example, if I'm at a specifically defined hotspot, such as a small boardwalk, and I count a red-bellied woodpecker.  If I end that checklist, and start another one just outside the perimeter, if I hear a Red-bellied Woodpecker before I'm too far away for the sound to no longer reach my ears, but I know the bird is up a tree on the boardwalk proper, I'll count it for the second checklist.  I believe I'm being true to Ebird's wishes with the second checklist, as I'm supposed to report what I see and hear.

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