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Nelson's Or LeConte's Sparrow


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Interestingly, birds like this along the east coast look much different than Nelson's in the midwest. Note the dark, muddy plumage, compared to the bright and crisp birds in the interior.

Nelson's and LeConte's are really beautiful birds-- they're secretive but if you're willing to trudge through the right wet grassy areas it's pretty easy to pick them out in flight.

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11 hours ago, Jerry Friedman said:

That is, a full-moon or new-moon high tide?

Must plan accordingly (if I ever travel to a coast again).

A new moon tide will be a bit higher than a full moon one, because the sun and moon are both pulling from the same direction.  On the other hand, there's a lot more light during the full moon.  Either will be higher than any other time in the lunar cycle.

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2 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

A new moon tide will be a bit higher than a full moon one, because the sun and moon are both pulling from the same direction.  On the other hand, there's a lot more light during the full moon.  Either will be higher than any other time in the lunar cycle.

As a physics teacher, I don't see that there should be a difference in tides between a full moon and a new moon, and I can't find anything about it on line.  The tidal force is a stretch, technically a tensile stress, so it's the same no matter which side the gravity is coming from.

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7 minutes ago, Jerry Friedman said:

As a physics teacher, I don't see that there should be a difference in tides between a full moon and a new moon, and I can't find anything about it on line.  The tidal force is a stretch, technically a tensile stress, so it's the same no matter which side the gravity is coming from.

I bow to your depth of knowledge and concede the point.

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20 minutes ago, Jerry Friedman said:

I  guess there are no marsh-living Ammodramus sparrows over there, but are there any interesting birds that pop out of salt marshes on a spring tide?  (Other than those legendary Black Rails in January.)

In the Bay Area we have a good amount of Black Rail. They're actually not that hard at all. Most evenings they are calling and you can get some glimpses on those high tides. Ridgeways rail are easier. The big price is king tides in January in tamales bay where you kayak for Yellow Rail.

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23 minutes ago, Connor Cochrane said:

In the Bay Area we have a good amount of Black Rail. They're actually not that hard at all. Most evenings they are calling and you can get some glimpses on those high tides. Ridgeways rail are easier. The big price is king tides in January in tamales bay where you kayak for Yellow Rail.

Thanks.  I guess I had my rails mixed up.

I have relatives in the Bay Area...

Edited by Jerry Friedman
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