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16 hours ago, SirVive said:

That's one of the few commonly eaten critters I've not done. Done cows, hogs, chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, deer, ... not sure if I'm missing any. 

I should probably clarify - those are things I've butchered, cut and wrapped, made sausage, cured and smoked bacon once, etc. Not just stuff I've eaten. 

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  • 1 month later...

Last week we had lovely temperatures in the 60's with lots of sun, bird migration, and I absorbed more vitamin D than I had over the past 6 months. Now it's in the 20s, blasting wind, and over half a foot of snow predicted. This is truly a Michigan moment.

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1 minute ago, Charlie Spencer said:

First I've heard of that!

I just now found out when I added an 11th photo and it excepted it. Thought for sure I had lost count of how many I had added. 

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On 5/4/2023 at 7:21 PM, Avery said:

Chasing the Atlanta Baird’s Sparrow tomorrow 🤞

How exactly does one chase small, highly-mobile birds that hang out in brush or trees, like sparrows, warblers, etc? 

I've gone after a Limpkin that was reported for a couple of weeks in the same football field-sized area, a bird large and slow-moving enough that dozens of birders found it.  There was a Horned Grebe reported hanging out for several days on a four-acre pond that offered nowhere to hide.  Ditto Black-bellieds on a much larger pond but staying mostly in one corner.

But passerines?  What are the tactics?  Show up, cross your fingers, and enjoy whatever else you may see?

Edited by Charlie Spencer
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2 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

How exactly does one chase small, highly-mobile birds that hang out in brush or trees, like sparrows, warblers, etc? 

Good morning everyone! My guess would be move very slowly and be extra observant, paying the most attention to the trees or brush. I have no experience chasing anything though so this is just what I personally would do.

Edited by Snake Fingers
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2 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

How exactly does one chase small, highly-mobile birds that hang out in brush or trees, like sparrows, warblers, etc? 

I've gone after a Limpkin that was reported for a couple of weeks in the same football field-sized area, a bird large and slow-moving enough that dozens of birders found it.  There was a Horned Grebe reported hanging out for several days on a four-acre pond that offered nowhere to hide.  Ditto Black-bellieds on a much larger pond but staying mostly in one corner.

But passerines?  What are the tactics?  Show up, cross your fingers, and enjoy whatever else you may see?

My strategy is to look for the people with big fancy cameras and binoculars staring at a shrub and whispering excitedly, then I glue myself to them until we all find what we're after. I've found some nice things using that method, it also helps when people give the exact coordinates of the bird.

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24 minutes ago, Birds are cool said:

Do they accept videos? I tried to get a video this morning, but no birds were out.

I believe you have to send ebird a portfolio to make sure you make good quality video's, lots of storage space I assume.

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4 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

How exactly does one chase small, highly-mobile birds that hang out in brush or trees, like sparrows, warblers, etc? 

I've gone after a Limpkin that was reported for a couple of weeks in the same football field-sized area, a bird large and slow-moving enough that dozens of birders found it.  There was a Horned Grebe reported hanging out for several days on a four-acre pond that offered nowhere to hide.  Ditto Black-bellieds on a much larger pond but staying mostly in one corner.

But passerines?  What are the tactics?  Show up, cross your fingers, and enjoy whatever else you may see?

In all seriousness, when the bird is originally found, the person that finds it should(and usually does) give the precise location of where the bird was, either by description or with coordinates. As people continues to see it, if it moves location, they add the new location in their comments. 
 

As for actually locating the bird, one of the biggest things with rarity passerines is the calls/songs. I can’t tell you how many times rarities have been located by sounds first. Carefully scan in the area where the bird is most often seen it the best bet, as well as the fact that there are usually other birders around checking the other trees/shrubs. 

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