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In a remote area of the Kissimmee Preserve State Park I was actually keeping an eye out for Florida Grasshopper Sparrows which are native there and while filming a Meadowlark I spotted these birds nearby.  The birds are catching the first direct sun of the day so the light may be a little tricky with the true coloring  and the screen grabs from the video not so great and to my non-expert eyes inconclusive as to ID. The most noteworthy thing in the sharp morning light in real time was the bright clean breasts and cream stripe in the center of the head weak white eye ring. Quality is probably not good enough to see any small yellow area. 

Thanks

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Thanks Tony, True, and Florida Grasshopper Sparrows are a seriously endangered unique species. I'm wondering if they can be positively ID'd as such from this evidence. I had to film from quite aways back as these prairie birds flush at the slightest disturbance. 

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7 minutes ago, TowheeTea said:

Thanks Tony, True, and Florida Grasshopper Sparrows are a seriously endangered unique species. I'm wondering if they can be positively ID'd as such from this evidence. I had to film from quite aways back as these prairie birds flush at the slightest disturbance. 

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Many of the photos I can find online show that the resident populations are banded. I don't see bands on the legs of these birds, which would indicate they more likely wintering migrants, not residents.

Edited by DLecy
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Just now, DLecy said:

Many of the photos I can find online show that the resident populations are banded. I don't see bands on the legs of these birds, which would indicate they more likely wintering migrants, not residents.

Thanks, I found this online: 

Paul Miller, biologist at the Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park furnished this photo of pratensis (GRSP) and floridanus (FGSP) together, and describes them as: “The obvious and simple distinction is that FGSP (on left) is much darker overall. More specifically, the feathers of the coverts, tertiaries, scapulars, and back are much blacker with whiter edging. The same feathers on the GRSP are lighter with buffy edging. The feathers of the nape on the FGSP are darker. The FGSP’s median crown stripe is also whiter while that of the GRSP is buffier.  Not so obvious is the fact that the FGSP’s bill is heavier/larger.”  https://fl.audubon.org/news/florida-grasshopper-sparrows-vs-grasshopper-sparrows-whats-difference

Here is as close of a clear picture as I could get that addresses the areas mentioned above and it does show a darker overall bird than non-Florida Grasshopper Sparrow, but not a direct side by side comparison. It does appear clear that neither bird is banded as you note. Banding would be the most conclusive ID in this case, with only 200 birds in existence. 

 

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