Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Recommended Posts

Hello, bird lovers. i hope no one is offended by my more pro-mammal stance in this instance.

Who is this feathered monster that terrorized my small animal family and attempted to murderously abduct one of my dear loved ones?

 

Merlin, by photo, gave (depending on image and separate attempt): golden eagle; red-tailed hawk; red-shouldered hawk; matches less likely (due to location), included white-tailed eagle, greater spotted eagle, himalayan griffon. By input of information, Merlin said likely red-tailed or cooper's hawk. 

 

Searching here, i seem to tend to get pictures that resemble more (to me) birds who live far away, or birds that match except for some feature that bothers me by not matching. Red-tailed and Cooper's hawks both were among results (but so was a bald eagle).

 

Suburban park and residential setting. Maple trees, a few others, line of thin conifer. Unafraid of humans. Seemed about to go for a small dog (on a leash, walking with a human) when their other brazen attempted abduction was thwarted. New York State, western region. On or around 3 december 2020, before sundown.

 

Tips, advice, suggestions on protecting my small mammal family from such bird deeply and greatly appreciated (keeping in mind the area is not 'my property', per se).

 

 

Screenshot_20201203-195119.png

20201203_164743.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

The band of streaks across it belly and unmarked breast make this a Red-tailed Hawk.

Thank you. Merlin's photographic exemplars (and a few others) seemed mostly to have markings or colour on the breast (except for a juvenile Borealis in Massachusetts), which seemed lacking with this one. -- An example of how one factor can leave me doubting my best efforts. Your swift response and brief explanation are appreciated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the Eastern subspecies, which is the subspecies we get most here in the Northeast, has minimal streaking on its breast, so it's a bit easier to ID a Red-tailed here than it is in the west.  But most subspecies of Red-tailed have heavier markings across the belly.

Edited by The Bird Nuts
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

Yes, the Eastern subspecies, which is the subspecies we get most here in the Northeast, has minimal streaking on its breast, so it's a bit easier to ID a Red-tailed here than it is in the west.  But most subspecies of Red-tailed have heavier markings across the belly.

Thank you for the information. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

I should add that Rough-legged Hawks also have a belly band, but it is barred or solid, and they have smaller bills among other differences in shape and plumage.

Yes, the rough-legged had also been a consideration. Thank you for this information as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...