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I saw a flock of these birds today in Lincoln County WA.  The birds were very vocal and quick moving (hence the tail shot) at the top of a 50 foot pine tree.  Seeing the red, my first impression was it could be a house finch, but I don't know if they have that notched of a tail or if the behavior fit.  I'm wondering if anyone here can ID a bird from it's tail?

 

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1 minute ago, Avery said:

That’s a really short tail, and those UTC are distinctive. Having trouble putting two and two together. Can you describe the vocalisations?

 

7 minutes ago, Avery said:

That’s a really short tail, and those UTC are distinctive. Having trouble putting two and two together. Can you describe the vocalisations?

I'm terrible at bird calls - but I did do a search while I was there and thought it sounded similar to a common redpoll.  But unless a bird has a very distinctive call I just can't be sure.

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To me, their calls sound like “tut tut tut tut” but there’s lot of variety in their calls that depends largely on where you live.

Ive never seen one by itself, usually in flocks of 7+.

The colour plus being in a coniferous tree (they are specially adapted to eat cones) lead me to them. Further more, the tail and the undertail coverts are more clues. 

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2 minutes ago, Louie said:

I'm pretty new to this, could you please tell me how you know?

One, the short tail with that patterned inter tail coverts. Two, the red. Three, the fact it’s in a coniferous tree 😂 

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Just now, Aaron said:

To me, their calls sound like “tut tut tut tut” but there’s lot of variety in their calls that depends largely on where you live.

Ive never seen one by itself, usually in flocks of 7+.

The colour plus being in a coniferous tree (they are specially adapted to eat cones) lead me to them. Further more, the tail and the undertail coverts are more clues. 

I actually had a lone Type 10 today, although there was a small flock of white-wingers nearby. 

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