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I'm not sure where I should post this, but here goes.

In a recent response, Tony Leukering asked someone if she had "a good field guide (Sibley or National Geographic)".  In a different post, HamRHead referred to the site birdzilla.com.  I recently stumbled on a reference to the app Merlin in a post.  This begs a question... for people like myself just starting out, what are some of the resources (apps, online sites, etc) that veterans find of high value?   I am currently sorting through thousands of pictures of probably 130-150 different birds from a meandering 18,000 mile drive around the continent (yes, I am recently retired!).  I am trying hard to ID them myself and only bring a few to the forum for help.  What resources should I be using?

As a starting list, here is what I've been using:

  • whatbird.com
  • allaboutbirds.org
  • macaulaylibrary.org
  • irma.nps.gov/NPSpecies/ - lists known species in parks and other sites administered by the National Park Service
  • fws.gov/refuges/refugeLocatorMaps/index.html - some individual National Wildlife Refuges have bird lists (not all)
  • Merlin (app)

Other resources I need to look into:

  • Sibley or National Geographic field guides
  • birdzilla.com

Any other suggestions?
Thanks!

 

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Definitely would recommend a field guide, and as others have said Sibley and Nat Geo are far and away the best for this region.  All About Birds is a site I use mostly to listen to calls, but it's good for ID purposes, life history info, etc.  

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I stuck this up elsewhere this week but I'm going to stick it up again.

I love National Geographic's hardcover 'Complete Guide to Birds of N.A.'  A field guide is great in the field, but by it's very nature it has to sacrifice some information to remain portable.  If you're looking for a resource around the house, something you can tag, dog-ear, and flip back and forth between when you're off-line, I'd spend the extra $20 and get a more detailed reference.  (But I'm a book nut.)  Be sure to get the second edition, not the first one from 2005 or so.

Edited by Charlie Spencer

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17 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Before this goes any further, I'd like to suggest it eventually be pinned.

:classic_blink: But there are so many pins now! I wonder if there could be one pin that would link to a separate pin page.

But the idea here is a good one--a resource guide for recommended field guides, desk references, apps, and websites.

The Warbler Guide is one resource I would recommend. Both the book and the app are great. I have one complaint about the app, however in that you can't zoom in on the photos. This might not matter as much on a tablet but on a small phone screen it would be a helpful feature.

  • Haha 1

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21 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

I stuck this up elsewhere this week but I'm going to stick it up again.

I love National Geographic's hardcover 'Complete Guide to Birds of N.A.'  A field guide is great in the field, but by it's very nature it has to sacrifice some information to remain portable.  If you're looking for a resource around the house, something you can tag, dog-ear, and flip back and forth between when you're off-line, I'd spend the extra $20 and get a more detailed reference.  (But I'm a book nut.)  Be sure to get the second edition, not the first one from 2005 or so.

Though the book fell short (for some groups, well short) of my hopes, I still agree with this sentiment.  [Somewhat of a conflict of interest, I authored one of the family accounts, but that does not lessen my liking of the book.]

If/when the Princeton guide ever comes out, I expect it to eclipse most, if not all, other "North American" field guides.

Edited by Tony Leukering
added info

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I will echo the previous recommendations.  The stack on my desk that I reference constantly:  The warbler guide, Nat Geo 7th edition field guide, Nat Geo hard back Complete Birds of North America 2nd edition.

I did not realize Tony worked on one of the sections of the Complete Nat Geo guide..  But on page 742 his credit is clearly listed.  I am impressed.

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