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Bird describing contest!!


IKLland

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4 hours ago, Greyhawk said:

Eastern Whip-poor-will

Pretty sure this is right. It is quite amusing hearing both singing at the same time. The whip-poor-will sings like twice as fast as the Chuck-wills-widow. Got to hear these two and a Common Poorwill earlier in the month all from the same spot and all singing at basically the same time. Had a few CONI too, so had four nightjars that evening.

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2 hours ago, Birds are cool said:

Yep 

Next:

This species lives in mountain forests, especially where sugar pine and ponderosa pine are abundant, and is often seen clinging to pine cones to get the seeds from inside.

 

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18 hours ago, Greyhawk said:

Next:

This species lives in mountain forests, especially where sugar pine and ponderosa pine are abundant, and is often seen clinging to pine cones to get the seeds from inside.

 

Often seen coming to the edge of water to drink, possibly because of the high proportion of dry seeds in its diet.

 

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14 minutes ago, Birds are cool said:

American dipper?

No, the American Dipper is usually seen in the water, not at the edge of it. Interesting species, I used it a few weeks ago.

The bird in question is not passerine.

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2 hours ago, MichaelLong said:

This cheery bird has multiple subspecies spread across North America. Without a trained eye the subspecies can be difficult to tell apart but are often fairly distinct in song.

Dark-eyed Junco

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