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Bird describing contest!!


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2 hours ago, kansabirdguy said:

This is the one! They have crazy field of vision which is what I was referring to. 

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The western population of this bird begins its fall migration before molting, molts while in northern Mexico, then continues to migrate further south. This pattern is common among waterfowl but very rare among passerine birds. In contrast to the western population, the eastern population of this bird molts on its breeding grounds before migration.

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9 minutes ago, Greyhawk said:

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The western population of this bird begins its fall migration before molting, molts while in northern Mexico, then continues to migrate further south. This pattern is common among waterfowl but very rare among passerine birds. In contrast to the western population, the eastern population of this bird molts on its breeding grounds before migration.

Willow Flycatcher? 

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2 hours ago, Greyhawk said:

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The western population of this bird begins its fall migration before molting, molts while in northern Mexico, then continues to migrate further south. This pattern is common among waterfowl but very rare among passerine birds. In contrast to the western population, the eastern population of this bird molts on its breeding grounds before migration.

Although primarily seed-eaters they are less common visitors to feeders than others because of their preference for thick cover. Having dense shrubbery and brush piles nearby will increase your chances for attracting them.

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1 hour ago, Greyhawk said:

Although primarily seed-eaters they are less common visitors to feeders than others because of their preference for thick cover. Having dense shrubbery and brush piles nearby will increase your chances for attracting them.

It is currently a single species, right? You aren't referring to "Rufous-sided Towhee" or something like that, right?

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6 minutes ago, kansabirdguy said:

It is currently a single species, right? You aren't referring to "Rufous-sided Towhee" or something like that, right?

A single species with two subspecies.

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2 hours ago, Greyhawk said:

Although primarily seed-eaters they are less common visitors to feeders than others because of their preference for thick cover. Having dense shrubbery and brush piles nearby will increase your chances for attracting them.

Winter Wren?

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5 hours ago, Greyhawk said:

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The western population of this bird begins its fall migration before molting, molts while in northern Mexico, then continues to migrate further south. This pattern is common among waterfowl but very rare among passerine birds. In contrast to the western population, the eastern population of this bird molts on its breeding grounds before migration.

Usually a much more southern bird, a famous member of this species spent the winter in a park in New York City almost ten years ago.

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7 hours ago, Greyhawk said:

A single species with two subspecies.

Males of this species sing in spring from exposed perches to advertise their territories. They also engage in visual displays including flying bouncingly like a butterfly or in an upright display, body-fluff display, bow display and wing-quiver display. These displays are used in antagonistic conflicts with other males or in breeding displays for females, with females rarely engaging in displays. Occasionally, males may physically clash with each other and may even kill each other in such conflicts.

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28 minutes ago, Peromyscus said:

 The male is bright and loud, it is migratory, and it is a state bird of an eastern state.

Really cuts down the options! Baltimore Oriole?

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An oddly tricky bird to spot, this species can be identified easily by voice, or by what its name describes. Of its North American family members, its breeding range extends the farthest north. 
 

 

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