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Bird describing contest!!


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3 hours ago, Greyhawk said:

Correct. You're it.

The song of this species is similar to that of another species which breeds in the same part of the country and in somewhat similar habitat, though this species has a smaller breeding range. The upperparts coloration are different tones of the same general color.

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10 minutes ago, Peromyscus said:

The song of this species is similar to that of another species which breeds in the same part of the country and in somewhat similar habitat, though this species has a smaller breeding range. The upperparts coloration are different tones of the same general color.

Scarlet Tanager?

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1 hour ago, Peromyscus said:

The song of this species is similar to that of another species which breeds in the same part of the country and in somewhat similar habitat, though this species has a smaller breeding range. The upperparts coloration are different tones of the same general color.

Eastern Meadowlark

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3 hours ago, Peromyscus said:

The song of this species is similar to that of another species which breeds in the same part of the country and in somewhat similar habitat, though this species has a smaller breeding range. The upperparts coloration are different tones of the same general color.

Apologies, the upperparts coloration *of both of these species* are different tones of the same general color. The underparts of this species are much less patterned than the underparts of the similar-sounding species.

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16 hours ago, Peromyscus said:

Apologies, the upperparts coloration *of both of these species* are different tones of the same general color. The underparts of this species are much less patterned than the underparts of the similar-sounding species.

This is tough one but I think Bewicks Wren might fit?  Similar sounding species being Song Sparrow?

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2 minutes ago, lonestranger said:

This is tough one but I think Bewicks Wren might fit?  Similar sounding species being Song Sparrow?

That's not a bad guess, though wrong.

Reworking hints/clues: The primary song of this species is often likened to the song of another (and wider-ranging) species which can be found in the same area but not necessarily the same exact habitat. Both species have plain backs of differing shades of brown, though the underparts are differently patterned in the two species. This species has a loud song.

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31 minutes ago, Peromyscus said:

That's not a bad guess, though wrong.

Reworking hints/clues: The primary song of this species is often likened to the song of another (and wider-ranging) species which can be found in the same area but not necessarily the same exact habitat. Both species have plain backs of differing shades of brown, though the underparts are differently patterned in the two species. This species has a loud song.

I feel like this might be a thrush of some sort?

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6 minutes ago, lonestranger said:

Swainson's Warbler?  Louisiana Waterthrush being the similar sounding species?

 

 

We have a winner! 🙌

My item was prompted by reading about a Swainson's Warbler heard and even seen at Chincoteague NWR in coastal Virginia this week. Unfortunately it is too far away for me given my current schedule. Plus it was only reported one day, on Wednesday.

I've only seen two and heard a third so I would have loved to have heard or even seen this one.

Edited by Peromyscus
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1 hour ago, lonestranger said:

Clue #1

The male of this species performs a courtship display by flying up into the air, gliding down, and rising again, sometimes several hundred meters into the air.

Wilson's Snipe

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3 hours ago, lonestranger said:

Clue #1

The male of this species performs a courtship display by flying up into the air, gliding down, and rising again, sometimes several hundred meters into the air.

American Woodcock

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