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Very new hummingbird feeder in South Florida. ID help please


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We just hung this feeder 2 weeks ago, and we have a visitor.  I am taking a wild guess that it is a female Ruby Throated hummingbird?  Am I in the ballpark?  Sorry about the poor lighting, and thanks in advance for your help.

 

Don

 

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2021-01-22 12.55.45.jpg

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Lovely immature male Ruby-Throat! His red throat will grow in gradually. Also a tip: you shouldn't add red food coloring to the nectar. It is strongly suspected that it may be harmful to the birds because they drink huge quantities of nectar every day so the dose of color is much higher for them than for humans who drink colored drinks. It's not necessary - the birds will come to the feeder with clear nectar - so it's also not worth bothering with. Your feeder may have come with some nectar mix, which is usually colored; but it's ridiculously expensive to buy more. Just use plain white table sugar - one part sugar to four parts water, and stir until it's dissolved. You also need to switch it out every few days depending on temperature. If it starts to look cloudy or you see any signs of mold (black spots) throw away the nectar, thoroughly clean the feeder, and refill with fresh nectar. You can make up batches of nectar and keep it in your fridge; some people make a concentrate and then add water to make the proper ratio of nectar. You can also just put a little nectar in the feeder at a time until you get more birds; eventually they'll keep you busy constantly refilling the feeder!

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1 hour ago, Aveschapines said:

Lovely immature male Ruby-Throat! His red throat will grow in gradually. Also a tip: you shouldn't add red food coloring to the nectar. It is strongly suspected that it may be harmful to the birds because they drink huge quantities of nectar every day so the dose of color is much higher for them than for humans who drink colored drinks. It's not necessary - the birds will come to the feeder with clear nectar - so it's also not worth bothering with. Your feeder may have come with some nectar mix, which is usually colored; but it's ridiculously expensive to buy more. Just use plain white table sugar - one part sugar to four parts water, and stir until it's dissolved. You also need to switch it out every few days depending on temperature. If it starts to look cloudy or you see any signs of mold (black spots) throw away the nectar, thoroughly clean the feeder, and refill with fresh nectar. You can make up batches of nectar and keep it in your fridge; some people make a concentrate and then add water to make the proper ratio of nectar. You can also just put a little nectar in the feeder at a time until you get more birds; eventually they'll keep you busy constantly refilling the feeder!

Yes, immature male ruby throated hummer

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4 hours ago, Don Long said:

Thanks so much for the advice, Aveschapines.  I bought this nectar concentrate at the local Walmart, but now that you have advised me that it is not the best thing to use, I will use your recipe, and make my own.  

You're very welcome, and thanks for taking the suggestions in the spirit in which they were offered. You'll save a lot of money too; the commercial concentrate is basically just colored sugar water. Once the birds all find your feeder you'd need another job to support their nectar habit! In peak season I use 2 kilos of sugar a week to feed mine.

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