Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, Seanbirds said:

I thought most terns did that. 🤔

You may be right.  When I went on my first seaside birding trip, the leader made a comment about differentiating our local terns by their hunting behavior, saying some point their bills down, some straight ahead.  I may have misunderstood.   

Edited by floraphile
typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, floraphile said:

@Seanbirds That was my "vs."   I thought the tail on this one was not forked enough for Royal, so went with Caspian.  There were 2 and they were constantly looking down, scanning the water.  I think that behavior is more consistent with Royal?

Tail is unreliable because it's spread out all the way. Do you have any more photos?

Edited by Seanbirds
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For what its worth, I would call this a Caspian.  The undersides of the primaries are dark and the uppersides of the primaries are white.  This is a match for Caspian.  Royal Tern has only dark trailing edge on primaries; uppersides of primaries are dusky. The tail is not forked enough for Royal.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is indeed a Caspian Tern. Notice the red (as opposed to orange) bill, the dark primaries, as Jim noted, and also the black in front of the eye. Though I suppose it is possible towards the end of February, generally the only large NA tern to retain a black cap to this extent in the winter is Caspian.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Birding Boy said:

I posted an obvious Goldeneye here once asking if it was a Scoter...

That’s nothing compared to my ring billed gull( adult) into a royal tern. Or the snowy egret into a herring gull, or the chicken nuggets in my kitchen into a pacific wren

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Birding Boy said:

I posted an obvious Goldeneye here once asking if it was a Scoter...

That's an upper-level mis-ID!  I love this Pete Dunne quote:  “The difference between a beginning birder and an experienced one is that beginning birders have misidentified a few birds. Experienced birders have misidentified thousands.”  😄 

Edited by floraphile
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, floraphile said:

That's an upper-level mis-ID!  I love this Pete Dunne quote:  “The difference between a beginning birder and an experienced one is that beginning birders have misidentified a few birds. Experienced birders have misidentified thousands.”  😄 

So true! I just got his book, I’m looking forward to reading it when time permits! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...