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  • 1 month later...

We all know fall is great for migrant birds but one of the places to look for those migrant and resident birds is in freshly mowed or plowed fields as the birds flock to take advantage of the bugs unearthed.

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2 hours ago, Clip said:

We all know fall is great for migrant birds but one of the places to look for those migrant and resident birds is in freshly mowed or plowed fields as the birds flock to take advantage of the bugs unearthed.

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I’m very jealous of that Cattle Egret...

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Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, Avery said:

I’m very jealous of that Cattle Egret...

Those Cattle EgretS-most of what you see are Cattle Egrets. Most have already gone back to non-breeding plumage.

Edited by Clip
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Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

Just saying.

No they originated in Africa but they have been here long enough ( over 15 years) and have reproduced with out mans help....to now be countable in the U.S. They were introduced in Florida but have spread so that even Colorado has them in the summer.

Edited by Clip
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4 minutes ago, Clip said:

No they originated in Africa but they have been here long enough ( over 15 years) and have reproduced with out mans help....to now be countable in the U.S. They were introduced in Florida but have spread so that even Colorado has them in the summer.

Yes, they made their way here in the 1940s.

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1 hour ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

They're not native to the US, though.

 

1 hour ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

Just saying.

 

47 minutes ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

Yes, they made their way here in the 1940s.

They weren’t introduced, they introduced themselves. 😉

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I've learned a few things to help me get closer to a bird without flushing it (if you don't have a meter long telephoto lens).  1) Most birds, it seems to me, get nervous at my presence at either 10, 20, or 30 yards.  Birds used to human presence will let me get much closer.  2) When trying to get closer, don't walk directly towards it or even look at it.  Instead, walk straight but at an angle, at a constant speed, and not looking at the bird.  I find stopping with my back to the bird for a bit helps de-threat me.  Tacking the other direction if you still need to get closer.  3) Using a bush, mound, or other cover to hide your approach helps.  This is how I got close  enough to photo the Blue-winged Teal below.  Actually, I couldn't show myself at all.  I had to get right to the edge of the cover and wait for the bird to come around the corner

 

Blue-winged Teal 2.JPG

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12 hours ago, MacMe said:

I've learned a few things to help me get closer to a bird without flushing it (if you don't have a meter long telephoto lens).  1) Most birds, it seems to me, get nervous at my presence at either 10, 20, or 30 yards.  Birds used to human presence will let me get much closer.  2) When trying to get closer, don't walk directly towards it or even look at it.  Instead, walk straight but at an angle, at a constant speed, and not looking at the bird.  I find stopping with my back to the bird for a bit helps de-threat me.  Tacking the other direction if you still need to get closer.  3) Using a bush, mound, or other cover to hide your approach helps.  This is how I got close  enough to photo the Blue-winged Teal below.  Actually, I couldn't show myself at all.  I had to get right to the edge of the cover and wait for the bird to come around the corner

 

Blue-winged Teal 2.JPG

I have noticed this as well. It is best not to look at them. Somehow they know even if they don't seem to be watching you. I would also suggest if you need proof of the bird to prove a rarity or something. Take the distant photo! Then try to get closer. If you don't no matter how careful you are you could lose the opportunity.

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3 hours ago, Clip said:

I have noticed this as well. It is best not to look at them. Somehow they know even if they don't seem to be watching you. I would also suggest if you need proof of the bird to prove a rarity or something. Take the distant photo! Then try to get closer. If you don't no matter how careful you are you could lose the opportunity.

Also crawling works well, especially for shorebirds. It's kinda hard for a human to do anything threatening when they're lying prostrate on the ground.

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23 minutes ago, Seanbirds said:

Also crawling works well, especially for shorebirds. It's kinda hard for a human to do anything threatening when they're lying prostrate on the ground.

Are you going to help me up😆 Just kidding but at my age it isn't as easy as it use to be.

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38 minutes ago, Seanbirds said:

Also crawling works well, especially for shorebirds. It's kinda hard for a human to do anything threatening when they're lying prostrate on the ground.

Makes for good pictures too! 

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1 hour ago, Seanbirds said:

Also crawling works well, especially for shorebirds. It's kinda hard for a human to do anything threatening when they're lying prostrate on the ground.

It's hard for us older humans to do anything at all when lying prostrate on the ground...especially getting up off the ground.  😄 

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1 hour ago, Clip said:

Are you going to help me up😆 Just kidding but at my age it isn't as easy as it use to be.

 

22 minutes ago, floraphile said:

It's hard for us older humans to do anything at all when lying prostrate on the ground...especially getting up off the ground.  😄 

Sorry, forgot about that!

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