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17 minutes ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

You've certainly been very nice on this forum. You've been very kind to me ever since I joined.

Well, I try to be nice to everyone here, especially the kids (of which I am one, as you all know).

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On 8/23/2021 at 8:12 AM, Clip said:

We all know fall is great for migrant birds but one of the places to look for those migrant and resident birds is in freshly mowed or plowed fields as the birds flock to take advantage of the bugs unearthed.

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We've got a fair amount of sod farms in NJ & birders know to head to them this time of year looking for birds like Upland, Buff-breasted, Baird's, Pectoral Sandpiper & American Golden Plover (European too rarely). They're even better when the fields are wet. I'm actually heading to one tomorrow.

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On 8/23/2021 at 12:57 PM, floraphile said:

This is actually an industrial waste pond, but also a surprise to me as far as birds

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There is a sewage treatment plant in Trenton, NJ that is known for having Warblers spending the winter there. They are apparently attracted to the abundant insects that are there all year long & processing the sewage also produces heat making it warmer then the surrounding area. I once had 8 species of Warbler there in January & even got my lifer Townsend's there.

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Just now, stitch58 said:

There is a sewage treatment plant in Trenton, NJ that is known for having Warblers spending the winter there. They are apparently attracted to the abundant insects that are there all year long & processing the sewage also produces heat making it warmer then the surrounding area. I once had 8 species of Warbler there in January & even got my lifer Townsend's there.

Yes, sewage treatment plants are known to be great birding places.

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On 8/25/2021 at 11:26 AM, Seanbirds said:

Well, I try to be nice to everyone here, especially the kids (of which I am one, as you all know).

Yipeeee!!!

( sometimes I write random things without much thought). Not sure why..

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This point came up in another thread and I thought this was a good place to address it also. Zoos and other Animal Parks can be good birding spots. NO you cannot count the captive birds but these places usually have true wild birds also. All of the photos below were taken in one visit to The Alligator Farm in St. Augustine, FL. in 2019. 

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It seems like for every rule in birding there are exceptions. Case in point when it comes to Phalarope it is the female who is the most brightly colored NOT the male. I understand that this is because it is the male that sits on the eggs. So in the photo below of two Wilson's Phalarope the female is on the left and the male on the right. While most seasoned birders have figured this out some new birders might appreciate this tip. This is true for all 3 of North America's Phalarope. The Belted Kingfisher female is also more colorful than the male. I have the female Belted posted first.

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2 minutes ago, Clip said:

It seems like for every rule in birding there are exceptions. Case in point when it comes to Phalarope it is the female who is the most brightly colored NOT the male. I understand that this is because it is the male that sits on the eggs. So in the photo below of two Wilson's Phalarope the female is on the left and the male on the right. While most seasoned birders have figured this out some new birders might appreciate this tip. This is true for all 3 of North America's Phalarope. The Belted Kingfisher female is also more colorful than the male. I have the female Belted posted first.

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Yes, I've heard about the Phalarope thing for a long time. I'm not exactly sure if female Belted's are necessarily more colorful- does the rufous serve as camouflage, or what other purpose does it serve?

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8 minutes ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

Yes, I've heard about the Phalarope thing for a long time. I'm not exactly sure if female Belted's are necessarily more colorful- does the rufous serve as camouflage, or what other purpose does it serve?

I'm not sure on the Belted. Perhaps others like @Liam might know. As for the question  about more colorful female Belted I think so she has the 3 colors the male only has two.

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This is why you should not feed ducks or geese bread or crackers. It does not give them the nutrition they need. In young duckling the nutritional deficit can cause a deformity known as Angel Wings. While the duck will still be able to swim and waddle it will not be able to fly. Which makes them a much easier target for predators. This deformity is shown below in an adult male Mallard. 

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  • 1 month later...

Bad weather can make for great bird watching. Below are some examples. I use to wish for snow, during migration season Spring and Fall, in Colorado. Just a few inches worth to bring birds down to refuel. To bring them to the sides of the roads or on to fences or into trees or to just make them more visible. Birding in the snow in Colorado awesome. I don't have any good photographic example for Florida with rain that I can think of but the puddles formed by rain storms in Florida can also be a good for bad weather birding. The lesson here is don't let a little weather keep you indoors.024.thumb.JPG.ce57136eab80eba24aa22048ed0dc5f9.JPG060.thumb.JPG.2b8a74fb28c6a87dc66efadc763828cb.JPG

 

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2 hours ago, Clip said:

Bad weather can make for great bird watching. Below are some examples. I use to wish for snow, during migration season Spring and Fall, in Colorado. Just a few inches worth to bring birds down to refuel. To bring them to the sides of the roads or on to fences or into trees or to just make them more visible. Birding in the snow in Colorado awesome. I don't have any good photographic example for Florida with rain that I can think of but the puddles formed by rain storms in Florida can also be a good for bad weather birding. The lesson here is don't let a little weather keep you indoors.024.thumb.JPG.ce57136eab80eba24aa22048ed0dc5f9.JPG060.thumb.JPG.2b8a74fb28c6a87dc66efadc763828cb.JPG

 

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You mean sometimes snows in fall and spring? 

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On 9/2/2021 at 3:22 PM, Clip said:

I'm not sure on the Belted. Perhaps others like @Liam might know. As for the question  about more colorful female Belted I think so she has the 3 colors the male only has two.

things are not as they seem…


https://www.dailypress.com/life/va-vg-fea-birds-0216-story.html

 

“Females have a third color, the brown “belt” across their belly. However, when we measured the ultraviolet reflectance of the belly feathers in males, we could detect a bright, flashy pattern of ultraviolet absent in females. Thus, to a kingfisher, males are still the more ornate gender, with females lacking ultraviolet patterns and covering up their belly under dull brown feathers.”

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41 minutes ago, Avery said:

things are not as they seem…


https://www.dailypress.com/life/va-vg-fea-birds-0216-story.html

 

“Females have a third color, the brown “belt” across their belly. However, when we measured the ultraviolet reflectance of the belly feathers in males, we could detect a bright, flashy pattern of ultraviolet absent in females. Thus, to a kingfisher, males are still the more ornate gender, with females lacking ultraviolet patterns and covering up their belly under dull brown feathers.”

Interesting! But to humans the female is more colorful.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Kevin said:

You mean sometimes snows in fall and spring? 

I don't get your question. Yes some times it snows in Colorado, in both the spring and fall. In fact it is not unusual at all either time of the year. And I would wish for that snow knowing it could make for great birding. And Colorado gets migrants both spring and fall.

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