Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Hawk species?


Recommended Posts

I've narrowed this hawk down to Coopers or Sharp-shinned Hawk or maybe Northern Goshawk?  Only picture I could fire off in time.  If anyone can give me the proper ID please and thanks.

DSC_0715.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, lonestranger said:

Why this distinction? 

Size and structure are roughly the same in the two. Males accipiters are smaller than females, and Coops are larger than Sharpies, hence the distinction. It can be difficult to separate female SSHAs from male COHAs in the field.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, DLecy said:

Size and structure are roughly the same in the two. Males accipiters are smaller than females, and Coops are larger than Sharpies, hence the distinction. It can be difficult to separate female SSHAs from male COHAs in the field.

So what rules out a female Coop's or male Sharpie? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clearer photos can show things like the nape, body proportions, beak size, legs, and tail...all of which help aid in the ID.

This bird should be left as SSHA/COHA, as it's not a Goshawk.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If location helps at all......  It was gliding and flying along and in a row of pine and cedar trees in a small barren town in the country looking for small birds.  No big forests around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Buddym said:

If location helps at all......  It was gliding and flying along and in a row of pine and cedar trees in a small barren town in the country looking for small birds.  No big forests around.

Respectfully, you've described the natural environment.  Could you provide a named geographic location - city, county, state, park, refuge, etc?

I don't think it's likely to help, I'm mostly pointing out the difference between the terms as we use them here.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/1/2021 at 8:20 PM, lonestranger said:

Why this distinction? 

Tail shape in accipiters is dependent not only on species, but also on age and sex. Adults and males have shorter, squarer-tipped tails than do juveniles and females. Adult male SS tend toward notched tails; if not notched, then usually quite squared. Adult female CH have noticeably more-graduated tails than do males. Since the tail is slightly rounded, it should rule out both adult male SS and adult female CH, although not in any absolute sense. Combining that with the relatively long appearance of the tail helps make that distinction a bit more certain. While the fairly sharp corners on the tail might suggest SS, the apparently wide pale tip to the tail suggests CH.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...