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1-3 are Pacific Wrens, note the brown color that is the same shade over the whole bird, the short stubby tails, and the tiny size compared to other wrens. 

4 is a Northern Rough-winged Swallow, note the very brown plumage with white underparts.

In addition to this, You will never find a White-throated Swift perched like that, they spend almost the entire day in flight, and sleep in crevices (or in Weep Holes under highway overpasses and bridges). Highway overpasses and large bridges are a great place to look for White-throated Swifts. In fact, it can be pretty difficult to find them away from those two types of structures.

Edit: Sniped by @AlexHenry

Edited by Aidan B
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9 hours ago, Connor Cochrane said:

Muir Woods is a great location for Pacific Wren. Virtually the whole area is prefect habitat for them. 
 

I remember the time I was there in March, they were singing their little syrinxes out.  I was going to ask owletbird whether they were still doing that in April, but then I saw the third photo.

Or should the plural of "syrinx" be "syringes"?

 

Edited by Jerry Friedman
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9 hours ago, Aidan B said:

In addition to this, You will never find a White-throated Swift perched like that, they spend almost the entire day in flight, and sleep in crevices (or in Weep Holes under highway overpasses and bridges). Highway overpasses and large bridges are a great place to look for White-throated Swifts. In fact, it can be pretty difficult to find them away from those two types of structures.

Edit: Sniped by @AlexHenry

I believe that's true of the whole swift family (that they don't perch like that, not that they were sniped by AlexHenry).  They're not even capable of perching on anything but a vertical surface.

Here in New Mexico I've never seen a swift around an overpass or bridge (though the Taos Gorge bridge would be a good place to look).  I only see White-throated Swifts in canyons, or at random places in migration, and not often.

Edited by Jerry Friedman
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2 hours ago, Tony Leukering said:

Swifts do not have hind toes (all four on each foot point forward), so they perch by clinging vertically.

According to this page, with photos, some swift species point one toe backwards or two left and two right (if I'm reading the picture correctly), though apparently not our species.  Still they only perch by clinging vertically, as you said.

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