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41 minutes ago, Aidan B said:

I'm thinking it's a Louisiana, but I have no experience with Waterthrushes

Me neither on the experience part. I’ve never seen or heard a Louie. But, I’ve read somewhere that not all Northerns are yellow below, and that Louies lack the strong flank streaks

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This is a tough one.  I have seen both, but I have much more experience with Louisianas.  I'm leaning Northern because of the supercilium that seems longer and ends at somewhat of a point, and the denser and narrower streaking on the flanks.  I put together a comparison of the two with my photos a while back:

waterthrushes2.thumb.jpg.13f289de9c9eb87b8d4a75571d16b7bb.jpg

Edited by The Bird Nuts
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I'll point out something I noticed in the @Mark5's pictures and @The Bird Nuts's comparison. The streaks on a Louie seem to be more coalesced, if that makes any sense. They are more like whole streaks, while on the Northern, there are more individual spots, and the streaks are kinda "spotty," like the spots haven't completely formed the streaks yet. That's what I'm seeing on the OP's bird, so I'm still for Northern.

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4 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

I've also noticed a difference in facial pattern and expression.  It seems the Northerns' supralorals are thicker and Louisianas tend to have a happier facial expression, I think due to the wider lores.

Good to know.

Edited by Avery
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Louisiana Waterthrush

A large, somewhat plump warbler, with a stout bill (bigger than Northern Waterthrush’s), rather short tail, and long legs.

Louisiana Waterthrushes are almost always seen near fast-flowing forested streams or creeks. On migration they sometimes use the edges of lakes and ponds if there is adequate vegetative cover. Louisiana Waterthrushes perch and forage in vegetation, on the ground, or at the water’s edge. They methodically bob their rear ends as they forage. Males sing mostly from low vegetation, often from a concealed perch. They are brownish above, with a very prominent white eyebrow (supercilium); pale below, with dark streaks. The supercilium is thicker in Louisiana than in Northern, and tends to flare at the rear. The legs are bright pink. 

Northern Waterthrush

A large but trim warbler with a short, fine bill, a rather short tail, and long legs. The bill is smaller than Louisiana Waterthrush’s.

They are Brownish above, with a prominent pale eyebrow (supercilium); pale yellowish or buff below, with dark streaks. The legs are duskier and less pink than Louisiana Waterthrush. The supercilium stripe is thinner in Northern Waterthrush than in Louisiana, especially at rear, and is faintly yellowish. Northern Waterthrushes forage near or on the ground or in shallow water, where their long legs enable them to wade into pond edges in pursuit of prey. They sing mostly from low vegetation, often from a concealed perch. Northern Waterthrushes are almost always seen near still or stagnant water, even during migration. Wooded swamps, ponds with brushy edges, bogs, beaver ponds, and similar settings attract breeders and migrants, while wintering birds use mangroves.

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