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Baltimore Oriole ID


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12 hours ago, cooldood said:

Looks like a pine warbler to me. 

Aside from potential aberration, Pine Warblers are never that orange. They also have blackish green legs and a significantly shorter bill. May I ask what made you think this was a Pine Warbler?

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2 hours ago, The Bird Nuts said:

How can you tell?  Is it the dark on the throat?  Thanks!

The wings are critical. Most passerines in their first plumage cycle do NOT replace juvenile wing and tail feathers, whereas older birds replace ALL feathers in their prebasic molt. Except for one central greater covert -- which is blacker with a whiter tip than all the others, this bird has not replaced wing feathers -- they are all obviously worn and brown. In spring, this absolutely identifies it as a bird in its first plumage cycle.

As with many birds, once you can discern the age OR the sex, determining the other is generally straightforward. So, once we know that the bird is an immature, the extensive black on the head indicates that it's a male (see page 565 in Sibley 2nd edition).

This is another example of the importance of learning and understanding plumages and molts in birds to effect more-certain species identification.

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1 hour ago, Tony Leukering said:

The wings are critical. Most passerines in their first plumage cycle do NOT replace juvenile wing and tail feathers, whereas older birds replace ALL feathers in their prebasic molt. Except for one central greater covert -- which is blacker with a whiter tip than all the others, this bird has not replaced wing feathers -- they are all obviously worn and brown. In spring, this absolutely identifies it as a bird in its first plumage cycle.

As with many birds, once you can discern the age OR the sex, determining the other is generally straightforward. So, once we know that the bird is an immature, the extensive black on the head indicates that it's a male (see page 565 in Sibley 2nd edition).

This is another example of the importance of learning and understanding plumages and molts in birds to effect more-certain species identification.

Got it, thank you!

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