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Not my bird... from Birding in Massachusetts facebook group. This is one of those moments where I'm scratching my head. They're reporting it as horned lark. Somehow I'm not seeing that. My brain went to "rare" things like redwing but I compared photos and, not quite... doesn't quite match any photos I see of any aged horned larks... 
Whatever it is, I'm just not familiar with that species or, that plumage of that species... 
One of these days my brain will retain more of these birds...  It's getting a little better each year, slowly... progress is all that matters right?  🙂 

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10220630722105558&set=pcb.1882196245281352

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, Avery said:

 

Are the white outer tail feathers a trick of the light then?

HOLA have white in the outer tail. In fact, virtually all of the non-sparrow brown birds that spend most of their time on the ground in open country have white in the outer tail. A goodly percentage of sparrows do, too.

Edited by Tony Leukering
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Just now, Tony Leukering said:

HOLA have white in the outer tail. In fact, virtually all of the non-sparrow brown birds that spend most of their time on the ground have white in the outer tail. A goodly percentage of sparrows do, too.

Ah I see now. Is outer web the correct term?

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6 minutes ago, Avery said:

Ah I see now. Is outer web the correct term?

For HOLA, yes. The outer web of the outermost feathers on each side (the 6th from the middle on each side, thus the 6th rectrix, abbreviated r6) is white, with the white wrapping a bit around the tip onto the inner web (see here). Realize that the outer web on rectrices is MUCH narrower than the inner web, which accounts for, probably, >80% of the webbed part of the feather.

The white in the tail of most of what I call "field birds" (larks, pipits, longspurs) is more extensive than in HOLA (LALOAMPI; CCLO), thus more noticeable in those species than it is in HOLA.

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