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Chimney Swift?


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Where do Chimney Swifts go when they are not noisily flying over head? We see a ton of them from our backyard here in NE Florida. But, always flying! I know the obvious answer is chimneys but there just are not many chimneys here so they must have some where they nest and/or rest right? I have never seen one not flying. My camera is too slow to get photos of them in the air. So where might I look for them perched?

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4 hours ago, Clip said:

Where do Chimney Swifts go when they are not noisily flying over head? We see a ton of them from our backyard here in NE Florida. But, always flying! I know the obvious answer is chimneys but there just are not many chimneys here so they must have some where they nest and/or rest right? I have never seen one not flying. My camera is too slow to get photos of them in the air. So where might I look for them perched?

A lot of them can fit into one chimney.  I hadn't realized it was a spectator activity, though.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zIzfL6cuhU

As for photographing them perched, I think that will be really hard unless you can get inside a chimney or a hollow tree.

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17 hours ago, Jerry Friedman said:

A lot of them can fit into one chimney.  I hadn't realized it was a spectator activity, though.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zIzfL6cuhU

As for photographing them perched, I think that will be really hard unless you can get inside a chimney or a hollow tree.

The birds they show at the beginning are European Starlings. I can't remember the word for what the birds in the video are doing but other birds do it too including Starlings. I have seen Red-winged Black birds do this in Colorado. But, yes you are correct I may never even get to see on perched much less photograph them.

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6 hours ago, Clip said:

The birds they show at the beginning are European Starlings. I can't remember the word for what the birds in the video are doing but other birds do it too including Starlings. I have seen Red-winged Black birds do this in Colorado. But, yes you are correct I may never even get to see on perched much less photograph them.

The birds in the entire video are Chimneys Swifts, not Starlings. 
 

Chimney Swifts do primarily roost in chimneys. Breeding bird surveys almost always note them in urban areas. Less is known about their overwintering roost locations, but many assume they roost in chimneys, churches and caves.

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9 hours ago, Clip said:

The birds they show at the beginning are European Starlings. I can't remember the word for what the birds in the video are doing but other birds do it too including Starlings. I have seen Red-winged Black birds do this in Colorado. But, yes you are correct I may never even get to see on perched much less photograph them.

Murmuring.  

Because of the lack of chimneys, the Chimney Swifts are in decline (like so many other avian species).  We are in the process of building a house and plan to erect a Chimney Swift house:  https://nc.audubon.org/news/build-your-own-chimney-swift-tower

Edited by floraphile
additional info.
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17 hours ago, DLecy said:

The birds in the entire video are Chimneys Swifts, not Starlings.

When I click on the link provided by Jerry, a Youtube Video comes up with a picture of a brick chimney with several European Starling perched on top of it. This is before clicking play. Perhaps this is not what pops up for you. Then the video immediately starts showing birds murmurating. I assume them to be chimney swifts but it is hard to tell for sure. If you are getting the same picture of a chimney before clicking play and you don't think those are E. Starlings well.....😲🥴

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"Murmuration" started as one of those useless group nouns in medieval and renaissance glossaries, which were dug up in the 19th century.  It meant a flock of starlings.  It's only in the last few year that it's come to mean synchronized maneuvers by flocks of other birds.  

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1 hour ago, Jerry Friedman said:

"Murmuration" started as one of those useless group nouns in medieval and renaissance glossaries, which were dug up in the 19th century.  It meant a flock of starlings.  It's only in the last few year that it's come to mean synchronized maneuvers by flocks of other birds.  

The word does sound quite medieval.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just to throw a monkey wrench into the discussion, some swift species are known (Common Swift) or thought to sleep on the wing.

From Birds of the World Common Swift account:

During the ten-month non-breeding period five birds equipped with data loggers in Sweden, overwintering in W or C Africa, were airborne for over 99% of the time and some of them never settled.

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9 minutes ago, Tony Leukering said:

Just to throw a monkey wrench into the discussion, some swift species are known (Common Swift) or thought to sleep on the wing.

From Birds of the World Common Swift account:

During the ten-month non-breeding period five birds equipped with data loggers in Sweden, overwintering in W or C Africa, were airborne for over 99% of the time and some of them never settled.

I wonder if they have some sort of function like sharks, which I have heard sleep with half of their brains at a time (they have to keep moving in the water to breathe).

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59 minutes ago, Tony Leukering said:

Just to throw a monkey wrench into the discussion, some swift species are known (Common Swift) or thought to sleep on the wing.

From Birds of the World Common Swift account:

During the ten-month non-breeding period five birds equipped with data loggers in Sweden, overwintering in W or C Africa, were airborne for over 99% of the time and some of them never settled.

Has anybody ever seen a Black Swift stationary outside the breeding season?  If not, I hope someone does that experiment on them.

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2 minutes ago, Jerry Friedman said:

Has anybody ever seen a Black Swift stationary outside the breeding season?  If not, I hope someone does that experiment on them.

Black is among the most likely sleeping-on-the-wing New World swift species. Unfortunately, the only project that has reported out data on tagged BLSWs used geolocators that obtained estimated locations only sporadically. The project did find the long-unknown wintering area for, at least, Colorado-breeding BLSWs, but data were wholly insufficient to report on activity patterns.

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