Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Camera body’s: Canon eos 70d vs canon eos rebel t6i vs canon eos rebel t7.


Recommended Posts

I am thinking about getting one later this year.( around November) I want to know in advance what I’ll be getting. That’s because I don’t want to have to do weeks of erase arch when I’m  ready to buy it. Which one of those is the best and will get me the greatest images? The probable lens I’ll be getting is the tamron 18-400 as a starter lens. 
thanks!

Edited by IKLland
Link to post
Share on other sites

You might get better feedback in the Photos discussion.  I can almost guarantee you'll do better at the Digital Photography Review web site (dpreview), and their Canon forum.

Edited by Charlie Spencer
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know a lot about Canons, but just looking at the specs I would say no to the T7 mainly due to the small number of focus points and slow continuous shooting.  If I had to choose between the T6i and 70d, I would choose the 70d mainly because it's a semi-professional camera with more features as well as faster continuous shooting among other things.

https://cameradecision.com/compare/Canon-EOS-Rebel-T6i-vs-Canon-EOS-70D

I have both an entry-level DSLR and a semi-professional by Nikon.  The semi-professional has more accurate focusing, faster continuous shooting, larger buffer (so you can take more photos at once and it will not lock up), quieter operation, weather sealing, way more customization options, and the list goes on.

I know this is not very helpful, but I thought I'd share my experience anyway.

Edited by The Bird Nuts
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

I know this is not very helpful

It was very helpful! Especially that website link! Only reason I considered the t7 was because it’s newer than the others, which probably doesn’t mean as much as I think it does...

Edited by IKLland
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suggest asking yourself what is wrong with your current gear and what advantages/features you are looking for with the new gear. If you have answers, then buying new gear should be a lot easier. Wanting to take better photos is a costly reason to keep upgrading if you don't know why you need that upgrade.  

I will say that it could end up being quite expensive buying starter gear in the DSLR product line, after just recently upgrading in the P&S product line.

P&S  $$$ + P&S upgrade $$$ + entry level DSLR $$$ + entry level Lens $$$ + DSLR Upgrade $$$ + Lens Upgrade $$$ = a lot of $$$$$$

If you're looking to buy better photos, skip the costly middle upgrades and go right for QUALITY gear, it'll be much cheaper in the long run. I'm not saying to buy the best there is, just don't waste your photography budget on cheap products that will probably leave you wanting better gear, even if the cheap stuff satisfies the itch of the moment. If you're going to pinch a few pennies, I suggest skimping on the camera and investing more in the lens, not the other way around. A quality lens on a cheap camera will produce better images than a cheap lens on a quality camera. Shop accordingly.

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, lonestranger said:

I'd suggest asking yourself what is wrong with your current gear and what advantages/features you are looking for with the new gear. If you have answers, then buying new gear should be a lot easier.

I’d also ask why you’re taking photos.  Primarily, are you taking shots to create art or to identify birds?  Long or close range?  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so I'll start by saying that I use a superzoom point and shoot, so when it comes DSLR photography, I have no idea what I'm talking about.

That being said, it seems to me that DSLR photography is a more complex skill than Point and Shoot photography, and is more difficult/takes more time to learn. Since you have to adjust settings for different light conditions, etc. It seems like there's just a lot more to think about, and therefore a steeper learning curve than with Point and Shoot photography.

Since DSLR photography is a skill in and of itself which will take you time, effort, and mental energy to learn, I believe it will distract you from developing your birding skills. In other words, since DSLR photography is more complicated and difficult than Point and Shoot photography, more of your time in the field will be spent screwing around with your camera, and less of your time in the field will be spent really paying attention to and studying the birds, compared to now.

My point is that, I think it would be a wise choice to continue developing your birding skills for a few more months or a year or a couple years, before adding on a whole new skill which will take time and effort to learn. I personally would recommend to continue using the point and shoot you currently have for a while (which you seem to be able to get some pretty good pics with, anyway), and focus on using your time in the field to continue developing your birding skills, and the fundamental skills of photography (composition, lighting, etc.). Eventually your skills will develop to the point that the gear you have is holding you back, and then it is time upgrade your gear.

I think a lot of people exaggerate the importance of the gear you use. In birding, and in other hobbies. The gear doesn't make the birder, and although it can help in some cases, using more complicated and difficult gear may actually distract you from birding while you are in the field and may even hold you back. Ultimately, if birding is your primary interest, I think you should focus on further developing your foundation of fundamental birding skills, before adding on another skill to learn. HOWEVER, if your primary interest is photography, and birds are merely the subject that you like, then by all means upgrade your camera ASAP.

I personally birded for many years before I started taking pictures. I know that these days with eBird and everything, people feel like they NEED a camera for birding to document unusual sightings. But when I was starting birding, spotting scopes were seen as much more important than cameras.

If I was you, I would definitely invest in a spotting scope before upgrading your camera, especially since you already have a camera. Unless you already have a scope of course.

Also, another advantage of waiting a little longer before investing in a camera upgrade, is that you can save up more. I would recommend getting as good of a lens as possible for your budget, and I would suggest maybe if possible waiting a little longer, saving up some extra money and getting a more expensive lens. That way you don't spend $500 on a lens just to decide you want to upgrade again a couple months later. 

 

 

Obviously, this is all just personal advice based on myself and my experiences. Everyone is different, and the advice I give might not apply or be relevant to you since you are different than me. This is just my take - to summarize: wait a little longer, save up a bit more, further develop your fundamental birding and photography skills in the mean time, and then when the time comes, invest in the best lens your budget will allow. (For some reason I feel like its more important to invest in an expensive lens than it is to invest in an expensive camera body, but I could be totally wrong. But I would suggest spending more on the lens than the camera body. Think of the lens as being the more important part of that purchase).

 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, AlexHenry said:

Since you have to adjust settings for different light conditions, etc.

I still shoot my DSLR in auto (no flash) mode a lot. When I'm just walking around birding I'll leave it in auto since the light conditions vary so much. I don't want to think about it if I pull up my camera for a quick shot. Only if there's a cooperative bird that's close and in decent light do I switch over to manual and dial in the settings.

The one trick for this working well is having a minimum shutter speed setup when you're in auto, at least 1/500. You can do this all the way down to the entry level Nikons and I assume the same is true for the Canon.

2 hours ago, AlexHenry said:

Since DSLR photography is a skill in and of itself which will take you time, effort, and mental energy to learn, I believe it will distract you from developing your birding skills

Part of me wishes I would've started with a superzoom bridge camera. I got the entry level DSLR slightly before I really started birding as a general purpose camera. I quickly found out that the 70-300mm kit lens wasn't cutting it. Had I started with the bridge it would've lasted quite a bit longer before upgrading to the bigger and much more expensive lens.

On 6/11/2021 at 8:49 AM, IKLland said:

The probable lens I’ll be getting is the tamron 18-400 as a starter lens.

If you're only going to use it for birding I'd suggest you look at the 100-400 lenses. They're a bit heavier and a bit more expensive, however, they should perform better when maxed out at 400mm. That's probably where you'll be take a lot of pics. There's also the Sigma 150-600mm contemporary that's in the same ballpark for price.

Edited by neilpa
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, AlexHenry said:

My point is that, I think it would be a wise choice to continue developing your birding skills for a few more months or a year or a couple years, before adding on a whole new skill which will take time and effort to learn.

Yes, thank you. I stated in my original post that it I do get a DSLR setup, it would be this winter, as I am doing the research early, so when it’s time to get it, I’ll already know . 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Connor Cochrane said:

I used an 70d and it was great. Many of my top rated photos on ebird are with it. I still have it and will probably sell it at some point if your interested. 

When you decide to sell it, could you send me a PM to give me the link? 

Edited by IKLland
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll probably be be getting the 70. If I can find a used one for really cheap, I’ll see if I can get the sigma 150-600. I will continue to research fit lenses. 
@AlexHenry @lonestranger, thanks for those really helpful posts. And thanks to all others that chimed in. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Seanbirds said:

DSLRs for less than $200??!!??!! I didn’t even know those ever existed!!

There are a lot of good quality cameras available in the used market. Many people will ignore an older 8MP, 12MP, or even 16MP cameras because the new ones have 20MP or more. What some may not realize is that you only need 8MP to print an 8x10 photo, and you only need a fraction of that to display your photos digitally. If you don't mind using products that were top of their line 5-10 years ago, you can get some great cameras for a fraction of the cost of todays entry level cameras. While there's been many advancements since those cameras were first released, there's no denying that the top of the line cameras took top of the line photos back then, so the same should hold true today.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, lonestranger said:

There are a lot of good quality cameras available in the used market. Many people will ignore an older 8MP, 12MP, or even 16MP cameras because the new ones have 20MP or more. What some may not realize is that you only need 8MP to print an 8x10 photo, and you only need a fraction of that to display your photos digitally. If you don't mind using products that were top of their line 5-10 years ago, you can get some great cameras for a fraction of the cost of todays entry level cameras. While there's been many advancements since those cameras were first released, there's no denying that the top of the line cameras took top of the line photos back then, so the same should hold true today.

Some newer lenses are not compatible with older cameras, though.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, and I bought all my DSLRs and lenses and a lot of my other equipment used.  Probably saved $1000.  I was patient and waited for deals on barely used equipment (on eBay and Craigslist).

Edited by The Bird Nuts
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/13/2021 at 7:25 AM, lonestranger said:

There are a lot of good quality cameras available in the used market. Many people will ignore an older 8MP, 12MP, or even 16MP cameras because the new ones have 20MP or more. What some may not realize is that you only need 8MP to print an 8x10 photo, and you only need a fraction of that to display your photos digitally. If you don't mind using products that were top of their line 5-10 years ago, you can get some great cameras for a fraction of the cost of todays entry level cameras. While there's been many advancements since those cameras were first released, there's no denying that the top of the line cameras took top of the line photos back then, so the same should hold true today.

I can’t believe my eyes! Isn’t this like a really really good camera? Or is that the 7d mark II?

F00744BC-9860-4B2B-9ED9-8073E3875693.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...