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WCSP subspecies.


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Yesterday there were WCSP that were singing that didn't really sound like the ones we get around here, so I'm wondering what they are. There are pictures and audio of them. There were around 15 of these birds (the photo and audio are of just one bird) but they all looked and sounded the same. Thanks! 

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Weird Wcsp.m4a

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The only subspecies that occurs along the central California coast in the breeding season is Nuttall’s (nuttalli). This bird you photographed is clearly a Yellow-billed and almost certainly a Nuttall’s.
 

It is far too early for fall migrant Pugetensis to show up.

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I don't have experience with Nuttall's, but this bird sounded interesting based on the recordings I've listened to. Are Nuttall's and pugetensis known to influence each other's songs (e.g. in the border areas where the populations mix)?

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6 hours ago, PaulK said:

I don't have experience with Nuttall's, but this bird sounded interesting based on the recordings I've listened to. Are Nuttall's and pugetensis known to influence each other's songs (e.g. in the border areas where the populations mix)?

I’m not sure as to your question, but, there is some literature that indicates that the the intergrade zone of song is fairly narrow a contact zones.

I think this particular recording is decidedly a nuttalli WCSP, and is perhaps a young bird singing a subsong since it sounds exactly like a Nuttall’s, just more abbreviated.

It’s worth noting as well that it is widely understood that there are geographic “dialects” in nuttalli WCSP song. BOW states:

The restricted period of time for song learning and postdispersal vocal convergence in Z. I. nuttalli results in discrete “dialects,” which also occur in migratory Z. l. pugetensis and Z. l. oriantha (Baptista 1975, Orejuela and Morton 1975, Baker and Thompson 1985). Dialects may reduce gene flow among populations (Baker and Cunningham 1985). Geographic variation in Z. l. nuttalli song structure occurs in a hierarchical pattern. Structurally similar contiguous dialects group into superdialects (Baker and Thompson 1985), whereas individuals with similar songs form subdialect clusters within dialect populations (Cunningham et al. 1987).”

Edited by DLecy
On my phone, not sure why text sizing is so funky when I post.
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