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Cerulean Warbler

From a couple days ago - Mourning Dove carrying nesting material: And a Cedar Waxwing:

Pied Billed Grebe struggling with a fish I didn't think was going to make it down it's throat.  Took about 10 minutes, but it proved me wrong!   https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/317620821#_ga=2.

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Don't take me wrong! @IKLland I just used this picture as an example.

To all to whom this may apply (including me)...  For example, this is a good shot! But the framing detracts from the quality of the picture. A common pitfall among beginner photographers is to always put the bird in the exact center of the image. It’s an understandable impulse, but one that results in all of the photos looking the same. Instead, experiment with the rule of thirds and place the bird along an invisible line a third of the way from the edge of the image.

Here are a few articles that explain further; https://www.audubon.org/news/how-compose-perfect-bird-photo https://www.photographytalk.com/beginner-photography-tips/composition-tips-for-beginner-bird-photographers

And yet be creative! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOt2w5Wnk94

I am also a beginner photographer and I struggle with getting the bird framed right. Marie Read's book on Mastering Bird Photography is a book I would highly recommend for bird photographers and is where I learned a lot.

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1 hour ago, Jefferson Shank said:

Don't take me wrong! @IKLland I just used this picture as an example.

To all to whom this may apply (including me)...  For example, this is a good shot! But the framing detracts from the quality of the picture. A common pitfall among beginner photographers is to always put the bird in the exact center of the image. It’s an understandable impulse, but one that results in all of the photos looking the same. Instead, experiment with the rule of thirds and place the bird along an invisible line a third of the way from the edge of the image.

Here are a few articles that explain further; https://www.audubon.org/news/how-compose-perfect-bird-photo https://www.photographytalk.com/beginner-photography-tips/composition-tips-for-beginner-bird-photographers

And yet be creative! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOt2w5Wnk94

I am also a beginner photographer and I struggle with getting the bird framed right. Marie Read's book on Mastering Bird Photography is a book I would highly recommend for bird photographers and is where I learned a lot.

i have not clicked the links yet, i will. basically you want the bird in the center? i think mine is in the center...

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A common pitfall among beginner photographers is to always put the bird in the exact center of the image. It’s an understandable impulse, but one that results in all of the photos looking the same. Instead, experiment with the rule of thirds and place the bird along an invisible line a third of the way from the edge of the image.

 

basically you want the bird in the center? i think mine is in the center...

That's not what I am trying to say. Sorry, maybe I did not explain clear enough.

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 it seems you don't want it in the middle?

Exactly! It's a common pitfall for beginners, including me, to center the bird and crop the photo in too close. Like I said don't take this the wrong way.

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1 hour ago, Jefferson Shank said:

Exactly! It's a common pitfall for beginners, including me, to center the bird and crop the photo in too close. Like I said don't take this the wrong way.

and this is to show the habitat the bird was in?

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22 hours ago, Aaron said:

This area the chickadees will land on you even if you don’t have food. Still very quick though!4C72DDB5-9C73-4E21-8E90-A116368ABFD7.thumb.jpeg.815bca4510e4f7d08862f00e4daeae28.jpeg

I've always wondered if a chickadee will still be brave enough to come to your hand after being banded!  We've been hand-feeding one chickadee here for, I think, four years now which makes her a pretty old chickadee.  If only she was banded.

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3 minutes ago, IKLland said:

@Jefferson Shanknow i understand what you meant, but i am curious why?

It's called art.  Most would agree that a "good" photo is a piece of art, and certain compositions, such as when the bird is off to the side of the frame, are more pleasing to the eye than others.  You can do whatever you want with your photos, but if you feel your photos need some improvement, Jefferson gave some good tips.

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@Jefferson Shanknow i understand what you meant, but i am curious why?

It gives the photo a more pleasing, balanced composition that catches the eye of the viewer. A tightly framing picture with the bird in the center gives a boring bullseye look. But that also depends on the angle and position of the bird. 

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30 minutes ago, Jefferson Shank said:

Don't take me wrong! @IKLland I just used this picture as an example.

To all to whom this may apply (including me)...  For example, this is a good shot! But the framing detracts from the quality of the picture. A common pitfall among beginner photographers is to always put the bird in the exact center of the image. It’s an understandable impulse, but one that results in all of the photos looking the same. Instead, experiment with the rule of thirds and place the bird along an invisible line a third of the way from the edge of the image.

Here are a few articles that explain further; https://www.audubon.org/news/how-compose-perfect-bird-photo https://www.photographytalk.com/beginner-photography-tips/composition-tips-for-beginner-bird-photographers

And yet be creative! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOt2w5Wnk94

I am also a beginner photographer and I struggle with getting the bird framed right. Marie Read's book on Mastering Bird Photography is a book I would highly recommend for bird photographers and is where I learned a lot.

well you cant have every thing in life, for example the first photo is framed better, however the face is slightly out of focus, while I much prefer the second photo's pose (and it's in focus) but unfortunately it's in the dead center IMG_0239.thumb.JPG.c0ee9af8599288b10a4256a4dce3f215.JPGIMG_0238.thumb.JPG.af8cc5d040b4a15e0b0a5a4434d6fccd.JPG

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