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Kings Canyon/Grant Grove, Sierras, CA Camping


Bird-Boys
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We are going to go camping for 3 days at Grant Grove area in about a week, and then again there mid-august. We will be looking for mountain-birds and any info on any of these birds will be very much appreciated:

* - Important

*White-headed, *Pileated, and *Black-backed Woodpeckers, *Williamson's Sapsucker, Dusky and *Hammond's Flycatchers, *Clark's Nutcracker, *Pinyon Jay, Mountain Chickadee, *Golden-crowned Kinglet, *Sooty Grouse, *Cassin's Finch, *Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch, *Pacific Wren, American Dipper, *Northern Goshawk, *Flammulated and *Spotted Owl, *Mountain Quail, Mountain Bluebird, *Townsend's Solitaire, Green-tailed Towhee, Fox Sparrow, *Red Crossbill, and Pygmy Nuthatch.

Thanks!

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15 hours ago, Bird-Boys said:

We are going to go camping for 3 days at Grant Grove area in about a week, and then again there mid-august. We will be looking for mountain-birds and any info on any of these birds will be very much appreciated:

* - Important

*White-headed, *Pileated, and *Black-backed Woodpeckers, *Williamson's Sapsucker, Dusky and *Hammond's Flycatchers, *Clark's Nutcracker, *Pinyon Jay, Mountain Chickadee, *Golden-crowned Kinglet, *Sooty Grouse, *Cassin's Finch, *Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch, *Pacific Wren, American Dipper, *Northern Goshawk, *Flammulated and *Spotted Owl, *Mountain Quail, Mountain Bluebird, *Townsend's Solitaire, Green-tailed Towhee, Fox Sparrow, *Red Crossbill, and Pygmy Nuthatch.

Thanks!

 

11 hours ago, Bird-Boys said:

Also *calliope hummingbird

Sounds like a fun trip! Looks like you have a lot of the same targets that I do! :classic_laugh:

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White-headed Woodpecker -- It should be easy. You won't have to go searching for it.

Pileated Woodpecker -- definitely a little more uncommon, your best chance is to listen for it's loud flight calls

Black-backed Woodpecker -- they are very local, so I doubt you'll find one unless you go to an area where they are known to be. The best place for them near you seems to be a place called big meadows

Williamson's Sapsucker -- pretty common in the correct habitat, the Big Meadows area seems good for them as well. They shouldn't be too hard to locate, but it might be worth studying up on their distinctive drumming.

Dusky Flycatcher -- Should be fairly common in good habitat, I've found they still sing and call a fair ammount at this time of year.

Hammond's Flycatcher -- Pretty much the same situation as Dusky, except they like slightly different habitat. The Big Meadows area looks good for both of them, so as long as you know how to separate the two I doubt you'll have any problems finding them.

Clark's Nutcracker -- Study up on their calls since that's your best chance at seeing one. I find they are more common as you get near the edge of the treelike, but they could be found anywhere in the area. 

Pinyon Jay -- They don't really exist on the west side of the sierras. Unless your planning on driving all the way to Inyo, good luck.

Mountain Chickadee -- Very Common, You'll get them.

Golden-crowned Kinglet -- Possibly just as common as Mountain Chickadees, just a little harder to see. You'll hear them singing all the time.

Sooty Grouse -- This is always a tricky one. When males are booming, they're easy to find, however it's to late in the season for that. There are a fair amount of reports of them in the area right now, but it's pretty much luck if you run into them. 

Cassin's Finch -- Usually fairly common up there, they are pretty active and frequently fly from the trees to the ground. They should also still be singing a little bit.

Rosy-finch -- Your area actually isn't too bad for them, however you'd have to commit a day for looking for them. You'd have to do a 10 mile hike above the treeline to access them. 

Pacific Wren -- Listen for their very distinctive song, they also make some chattering. There seems to be some reports right in grant's grove.

Dipper -- Look down a river at a bridge and see if you can see any on any rocks or flying up and down the river. They aren't hard. 

Goshawk -- There are currently a few reports in the area, a lot of it is just getting lucky and seeing one fly above you if you don't know a nesting location.

Flammulated Owl -- They don't seem to be common in your area, If you want to try I'd suggest traveling to somewhere on ebird where they've been perviously reported and try playing for them there. You'd have to be extremely lucky to hear one calling unprompted, especially at this time of year.

Spotted Owl -- I don't know much about what habitat they like in the sierras, however if they like the same habitat as over on the coast, maybe listen for them at one of the sequoia groves.

Mountain Quail -- Driving along forest service roads is always a good option for them, however learn their calls as they can be heard from far away.

Mountain Bluebird -- High elevation meadows are pretty reliable for them, there are a good amount of reports right around Grants Grove.

Townsend's Solitaire -- Pretty common and easy to detect If you know their calls. Look for them peached atop a stage, however they can be lower down to the ground as well. 

Green-tailed Towhee -- Pretty common in the correct habitat, especially the higher up you get. Seems to be reported fairly often from Grants Grove, as well as Big Meadow.

Fox Sparrow -- Common in the area, listen for their jumbled song. 

Red Crossbill -- most likely you'll encounter them when a flock flies above you. Learn their calls so you can recognize them when they do.

Pygmy Nuthatch -- They Haven't been reported recently, however Big Meadows as well as the town both seem decent for them. Listen for their calls, they seem to be always calling.

Calliope Hummingbird -- I think I see them most often in open areas, most likely you'll see them when they fly right by you, however they are often peached on a snag. Trying to find a hummingbird feeder would also be helpful.

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6 minutes ago, Bird-Boys said:

How is that drumming different than Red-breasted?

To quote all about birds "Their drum tapers off in volume and speed, making it unlike that of Red-breasted Sapsuckers’ more erratic rhythm." 

Once you hear it a few times you can tell the difference. 

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