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Red-tailed Hawk?


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I did try to ID this hawk.  My guess is a Red-tailed hawk, but honestly, it was kind of a process of elimination. The other hawks just didn't seem to be a better fit based on the view I had. I only saw it from below. I don't see much, if any red in the tail, but the other markings are close to a RT.

8_1_2020 Hawk DSC_7648.jpg

8_1_2021 Hawk DSC_7628.jpg

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32 minutes ago, Laura said:

I only saw it from below. I don't see much, if any red in the tail, but the other markings are close to a RT.

You have two excellent marks here.  There's the speckled band around the bird's midsection.  There's also the dark markings on the patagials, that area on the leading edge of the wing between the neck and 'wrist'.  Those are great indicators for Red-tailed.

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32 minutes ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

I can see a tint of red, maybe it's just washed out.

OK, could be my partial color-blindness.  I would like to emphasize to @Laura, though, that Red-tailed Hawks don't necessarily have red in their tails.  The marks that @Charlie Spencermentioned are much better.  Where was this picture taken, by the way?

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28 minutes ago, Charlie Spencer said:

You have two excellent marks here.  There's the speckled band around the bird's midsection.  There's also the dark markings on the patagials, that area on the leading edge of the wing between the neck and 'wrist'.  Those are great indicators for Red-tailed.

Hi, Charlie, 

I did take those markings into consideration, but the tail just really through me off.

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8 minutes ago, Jerry Friedman said:

OK, could be my partial color-blindness.  I would like to emphasize to @Laura, though, that Red-tailed Hawks don't necessarily have red in their tails.  The marks that @Charlie Spencermentioned are much better.  Where was this picture taken, by the way?

Hi, Jerry,

Part of the issue was the lighting. It was fairly bright, but the hawk was quite high above my head, and a coupe of times I almost tipped over backwards as I tried to follow it as it flew over me. In different lighting I might have been able to get better exposure. Some of the photos were over exposed and some were underexposed. I do know that the red in the tail can vary quite  bit, and in some of the photos it's more pronounced, but these were underexposed which tens to exaggerate colors.  The photo was taken yesterday at about 10:30 in the morning- 30 miles west of Minneapolis and about a 2 minute bird flight from Lake Minnetonka.  At the same time those photos were taken, 2 ospreys (one with a fish in it's talons) and one bald eagle flew over me, and I could hear a red-shouldered hawk in the woods behind me. It was an exciting morning.

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1 hour ago, Laura said:

Hi, Jerry,

Part of the issue was the lighting. It was fairly bright, but the hawk was quite high above my head, and a coupe of times I almost tipped over backwards as I tried to follow it as it flew over me. In different lighting I might have been able to get better exposure. Some of the photos were over exposed and some were underexposed. I do know that the red in the tail can vary quite  bit, and in some of the photos it's more pronounced, but these were underexposed which tens to exaggerate colors.  The photo was taken yesterday at about 10:30 in the morning- 30 miles west of Minneapolis and about a 2 minute bird flight from Lake Minnetonka.  At the same time those photos were taken, 2 ospreys (one with a fish in it's talons) and one bald eagle flew over me, and I could hear a red-shouldered hawk in the woods behind me. It was an exciting morning.

I think these photos are very well exposed.

This hawk is a juvenile because of its obviously barred tail (especially given that it's the Eastern subspecies, being from Minnesota and having a white throat--Western adults can have more barring on the tail) and the lack of a heavy dark border on the trailing edge of the wings.  Juvenile Red-tails typically have no red in the tails.  (There are exceptions.)

https://www.featheredphotography.com/blog/2020/08/24/young-red-tailed-hawk-calling/

So not seeing red in the tail is no reason to doubt that it's a Red-tailed Hawk.

Fun raptor sightings!

 

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