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Arizona Hummingbirds


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Hello.  All these were taken between 7/31 and 8/5 around the town of Cottonwood in Arizona.  After looking at my photos I think they all look like Black-chinned.  All of these locations also had Anna's listed as common and several others as more remote possibilities.  Opinions?

1)  7/31 Near Oak Creek in the town of Cornville.

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2)  8/1 In the town of Jerome at the state park.

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3)  8/2 at the visitor's center in Red Rocks State Park.

2104443346_DSC01506rHummingbird.jpg.a83ccd1d5be22022c0bf229dec501278.jpg

4)  8/3 at the Gold Mine Ghost Town outside of Jerome.

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5) 8/5 at the picnic area for Montezuma's Well State Park.

DSC01854r.jpg.355b462beafbcb829cf8b1cbcfdc862f.jpg

Thanks!

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The things that help solidify the identify of female and immature hummingbirds are good pictures of the tail spread and/or clear pictures of the folded wings (preferably both). Vocalizations can be helpful too with certain species. 

That being said, I think all of these are fine for Black-chinned Hummingbirds with the exception of #1, which feels like it's better left as selasphorus sp., with that long tail and significantly buffy flanks. It's likely a RUHU, but BTHUs are at this location and I'm not sure we could definitively rule it out based on the single photo provided. The tail spread photo (#4) is not a Rufous Hummingbird as the outer rectrices are much too wide and the base of the feather is not rufous. I think what you are seeing is the lighting of the photo and perhaps a reflection on the ventral view of the bird. 

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8 hours ago, Aidan B said:

I think these are all Black-chinned except for one, which appears to be a Rufous like @IKLland said.

 

55 minutes ago, DLecy said:

The things that help solidify the identify of female and immature hummingbirds are good pictures of the tail spread and/or clear pictures of the folded wings (preferably both). Vocalizations can be helpful too with certain species. 

That being said, I think all of these are fine for Black-chinned Hummingbirds with the exception of #1, which feels like it's better left as selasphorus sp., with that long tail and significantly buffy flanks. It's likely a RUHU, but BTHUs are at this location and I'm not sure we could definitively rule it out based on the single photo provided. The tail spread photo (#4) is not a Rufous Hummingbird as the outer rectrices are much too wide and the base of the feather is not rufous. I think what you are seeing is the lighting of the photo and perhaps a reflection on the ventral view of the bird. 

This one also looks like rufous to me, but I’m wrong. 
B323CAD3-1682-4377-9087-90D1672F60FD.thumb.jpeg.ff904a180f6d8c5fcf9660370d9048d6.jpeg

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