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Liam's Weekly Quiz!


Liam
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1 hour ago, Avery said:

Grrrr. I talked myself out of the last one being Great-crested because of the handkerchief not being black. ūü§¶‚Äć‚ôāÔłŹ¬†

At least I got the ones I haven’t seen right!

Same here, I missed the only one I've seen tooūüėÜ.

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14 hours ago, Liam said:

I forgot about this after lunch and now it's after midnight so I'll give the results now and share the scoreboard and detailed analysis later. 

 

Bird 1 is a Dusky-capped Flycatcher.

Bird 2 is a Brown-crested Flycatcher.

Bird 3 is a Great Crested Flycatcher

 

The biggest differences are in bill size and the amount of yellow in the belly. I'll provide a more thorough analysis when I post the scoreboard. Great job, folks!

I got all of them right!!!!!!! 

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Making the scoreboard now.

 

Tempted to knock a point off for misspellings.¬†ūüėõ¬†(kidding)

Here is the correct spelling:

Dusky-capped Flycatcher <--- hyphenated with the second word lowercase

Brown-crested Flycatcher <--- hyphenated with the second word lowercase

Great Crested Flycatcher <--- NOT hyphenated and the second word is uppercase.

 

The distinction here is which word the adjective(s) modifies.

Dusky and Brown modify cap and crest, respectively.

Great modifies Flycatcher, as does Crested.

 

So the former two Flycatchers have either a Dusky cap or a Brown crest.

The latter Flycatcher is Great and Crested. 

 

It's an all-too-common oversight that birders make. Similar to Lesser Black-backed Gull and Great (not Greater!!) Black-backed Gull.

 

Note that again, in hyphenated names, the second word is always lowercase if it's in the first part of the name (e.g., Blue-winged, Grass-green, Black-crowned). But if it's hyphenated in the second part of the name (e.g., Scrub-Jay, Night-Heron, Storm-Petrel), it's upper-case. Why these examples are hyphenated and not others (e.g., why not Great Crested-Flycatcher or Common Ground-Dove?) is kind of ambiguous and enigmatic.

 

Weird cases are Chuck-will's-widow and Eastern/Mexican Whip-poor-will, Andean/Guianean Cock-of-the-rock, Gray/Bare-faced/White-bellied Go-away-bird.

Also Crowned Slaty Flycatcher (genus Empidonomus) vs. White-eyed/Angola/Abyssinian Slaty-Flycatcher (Melaenornis) are an interesting case study of their own.

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Alright folks here is a link to the scoreboard: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1O-lJlp8rr2VAK3CFkMpCkMB-ayTbV7Us/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=104899496886098762905&rtpof=true&sd=true

 

Like I mentioned before, the best way to distinguish among Myiarchus flycatchers is bill size and belly color. Bill size is largest on Brown-crested and Great Crested. They are the longest and thickest of all their congeners recorded in the ABA. Ash-throated's bill is similar in length, but less thick. Nutting's bill is thick-ish but short. Finally, La Sagra's and Dusky-capped bills are long but thin.

The brightness of the yellow on the belly goes in this order from brightest to dullest: Great Crested, Nutting's, Brown-crested, Dusky-capped, Ash-throated, and La Sagra's.

So considering all three of the quiz birds have quite a yellow belly, we can rule out Ash-throated and La Sagra's. If we look at bill size, all of them have a bill too long for Nutting's. The third bird is therefore clearly a Dusky-capped given the bill size and yellow belly.

Brown-crested and Great Crested are very similar in their bill and to a lesser extent, the yellow in the belly. However, the difference in the color of the belly is quite noticeable here and so we can conclude that 2 is a Brown-crested due to the duller yellow belly and 3 is a Great Crested.

Context clues are also pretty big here. In the second photo, the bird is perched in a mesquite tree and the picture screams Tamaulipan mezquital habitat, which aligns with Brown-crested's range. The third bird is perched on a wooden deck, a familiar scene for the more domiciliary Great Crested Flycatcher. The first photo is less obvious, but those who have seen Dusky-capped will find the rugged oak setting very fitting for this species.

These photos were taken (1) in Huachuca Canyon, AZ in May, (2) in Willacy County, TX in May, and (3) Hephzibah, GA in May. I guess May may be the opportune time to see Myiarchus flycatchers! Hah!

Thanks for your guesses! Let me know if I made any mistakes on the scoreboard. Another quiz coming soon!

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9 minutes ago, Liam said:

These photos were taken (1) in Huachuca Canyon, AZ in May, (2) in Willacy County, TX in May, and (3) Hephzibah, GA in May. I guess May may be the opportune time to see Myiarchus flycatchers! Hah!

I knew that Dusky-capped was in Arizona. That type of oak forest is pretty unique in the US (though maybe there's some in NM or TX?)

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46 minutes ago, Liam said:

Alright folks here is a link to the scoreboard: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1O-lJlp8rr2VAK3CFkMpCkMB-ayTbV7Us/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=104899496886098762905&rtpof=true&sd=true

 

Like I mentioned before, the best way to distinguish among Myiarchus flycatchers is bill size and belly color. Bill size is largest on Brown-crested and Great Crested. They are the longest and thickest of all their congeners recorded in the ABA. Ash-throated's bill is similar in length, but less thick. Nutting's bill is thick-ish but short. Finally, La Sagra's and Dusky-capped bills are long but thin.

The brightness of the yellow on the belly goes in this order from brightest to dullest: Great Crested, Nutting's, Brown-crested, Dusky-capped, Ash-throated, and La Sagra's.

So considering all three of the quiz birds have quite a yellow belly, we can rule out Ash-throated and La Sagra's. If we look at bill size, all of them have a bill too long for Nutting's. The third bird is therefore clearly a Dusky-capped given the bill size and yellow belly.

Brown-crested and Great Crested are very similar in their bill and to a lesser extent, the yellow in the belly. However, the difference in the color of the belly is quite noticeable here and so we can conclude that 2 is a Brown-crested due to the duller yellow belly and 3 is a Great Crested.

Context clues are also pretty big here. In the second photo, the bird is perched in a mesquite tree and the picture screams Tamaulipan mezquital habitat, which aligns with Brown-crested's range. The third bird is perched on a wooden deck, a familiar scene for the more domiciliary Great Crested Flycatcher. The first photo is less obvious, but those who have seen Dusky-capped will find the rugged oak setting very fitting for this species.

These photos were taken (1) in Huachuca Canyon, AZ in May, (2) in Willacy County, TX in May, and (3) Hephzibah, GA in May. I guess May may be the opportune time to see Myiarchus flycatchers! Hah!

Thanks for your guesses! Let me know if I made any mistakes on the scoreboard. Another quiz coming soon!

Thanks!

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4 hours ago, Liam said:

Jk I think I'll stick to birds I can actually identify

Whoa! Now we know we can gang up and challenge the infallibility of his ID if too many of us get the same one 'wrong'¬†ūüí™

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1 hour ago, Liam said:

I'm not so egotistical that I won't accept if one of my quiz IDs was wrong. 

I'll be like Kendrick, sitting down and humble.

nah man, that's not it. You run the game, you've got the whole world talking. We want the funk!

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