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Liam's Weekly Quiz!


Liam
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4 hours ago, Kevin said:

Well, being that y'all all did so well on last week's quiz, I will try to make this one a little harder. 

1

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2

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2400

The last one #3 is an all too common invasive pest species 😬

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3 hours ago, Kevin said:

Okay, I have only received 4 guesses so far, so I'll will be extending this quiz I suppose.

I missed one when I counted, 5 in actually. Still missing ten people though. 

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1 Adult, Basic/nonbreeding plumaged Spotted Sandpiper. Note the Brown head and wings, which differ it from Solitary. The bill is partly orange colored, which is wrong for solitary, also the bill is longer and straighter than most Calidris Sandpipers. This bird is in basic plumage, a breeding plumaged bird would have distinct spots. This photo was taken in Palo Pinto County Texas, at Possum Kingdom Lake, in December. 

2 Juvenile Tufted x Black-crested Titmouse, Tufted Titmouse start showing a black forehead, pretty young, something this bird does not have, but other than that and range, this is a pretty hard id, so don't feel bad if you got it wrong. This photo was taken in Palo Pinto County Texas.

Juvenile Chipping Sparrow. This bird has a dark eyeline that continues even once it gets to the eyes, down towards it lores, something most sparrows don't have. Also this bird has a pink bill and starting to get a rufous crown. The bird is heavily streaked indicating it is a young bird. 

 

Those who guessed the the correct species will get 3 points, 2 points if you got in the right genus, and 1 point if you got the family. Also 1 additional point for sex, age, and subspecies, when it can be determined.

 Here is the scoreboard, please let me know if I made any mistakes. 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1O-lJlp8rr2VAK3CFkMpCkMB-ayTbV7Us/edit#gid=1696946999

 

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6 hours ago, Kevin said:

1 Adult, Basic/nonbreeding plumaged Spotted Sandpiper. Note the Brown head and wings, which differ it from Solitary. The bill is partly orange colored, which is wrong for solitary, also the bill is longer and straighter than most Calidris Sandpipers. This bird is in basic plumage, a breeding plumaged bird would have distinct spots. This photo was taken in Palo Pinto County Texas, at Possum Kingdom Lake, in December. 

2 Juvenile Tufted x Black-crested Titmouse, Tufted Titmouse start showing a black forehead, pretty young, something this bird does not have, but other than that and range, this is a pretty hard id, so don't feel bad if you got it wrong. This photo was taken in Palo Pinto County Texas.

Juvenile Chipping Sparrow. This bird has a dark eyeline that continues even once it gets to the eyes, down towards it lores, something most sparrows don't have. Also this bird has a pink bill and starting to get a rufous crown. The bird is heavily streaked indicating it is a young bird. 

 

Those who guessed the the correct species will get 3 points, 2 points if you got in the right genus, and 1 point if you got the family. Also 1 additional point for sex, age, and subspecies, when it can be determined.

 Here is the scoreboard, please let me know if I made any mistakes. 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1O-lJlp8rr2VAK3CFkMpCkMB-ayTbV7Us/edit#gid=1696946999

 

I went with pure tufted for the titmouse…other than that got it all..

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19 hours ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

The titmouse...😢 At least I learned something.

 

13 hours ago, IKLland said:

I went with pure tufted for the titmouse…other than that got it all..

Yeah the titmouse was hard,(That was the point!) all but one person missed it.

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11 minutes ago, Kevin said:

 

Yeah the titmouse was hard,(That was the point!) all but one person missed it.

There's hard, and then there's juvenile hybrid hard! (I think it's a great quiz subject.)

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