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Ruby throat or black chinned?


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On 10/13/2021 at 8:40 PM, Nana said:

Corpus Christi, last weekend. The tail looked short to me and the wings looked no longer than the tail. So I thought maybe I had found a black chinned. 

2099567056_VqQpUJKiQTuwPqgvJp3pg_thumb_65f9.thumb.jpg.0f18e31173fa723385f2ee703abeac5a.jpg

The tail is partly missing...

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Interesting bird. It's molting it's remiges and rectrices and thus confusing me. Per Howell, "Because of the P8-P10-P9 sequence of outer primary replacement, one could see a bird with P10 partially grown and a worn P9 retained, and mistakenly assume that P9 was the longest outer primary. This could affect judgement of “outer” primary shapes or relative wing/tail projectons on perched birds, and should be borne in mind. Also consider how tail moult (usually occurring when the outer primaries moult) could affect perception of wing/tail projections."

If we had a really clean shot of the inner primaries, we may be able to ID the bird; but the longest outer primaries look vastly different due to molt. I'd safely call it Archilochus sp.

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59 minutes ago, AlexHenry said:

Narrow pointy tipped P10 = Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Yeah, I guess it’s safe to call that narrow longest remige P10 on the near wing. It’s in heavy wing and tail molt and the opposite wing has either molted P10 or it’s relatively obscured. I agree with RTHU.

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9 hours ago, DLecy said:

Yeah, I guess it’s safe to call that narrow longest remige P10 on the near wing.

That’s what I was thinking. I think your point stands though and extra care is definitely required with molting birds.

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21 hours ago, DLecy said:

Interesting bird. It's molting it's remiges and rectrices and thus confusing me. Per Howell, "Because of the P8-P10-P9 sequence of outer primary replacement, one could see a bird with P10 partially grown and a worn P9 retained, and mistakenly assume that P9 was the longest outer primary. This could affect judgement of “outer” primary shapes or relative wing/tail projectons on perched birds, and should be borne in mind. Also consider how tail moult (usually occurring when the outer primaries moult) could affect perception of wing/tail projections."

If we had a really clean shot of the inner primaries, we may be able to ID the bird; but the longest outer primaries look vastly different due to molt. I'd safely call it Archilochus sp.

Thank you, I think I understand now why it looked different to me. 

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