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Birding by Ear sound files


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Hi all, this is going to be my first attempt to link to a sound file, ever in any forum, so hopefully this works. 🙂

As mentioned, I moved this summer from WY to OR, so I'm having to learn a lot of bird song and call all over again, and then the regional dialects as well. Like a lot of folks I'm sure, I've been playing with the Merlin sound tool with varying degrees of success. I don't trust it enough to ID without a visual on the bird unless I get a very clear recording that I can listen to another example of and say definitively yes, that is the bird.

The first one is from 10/9/2021 at Bottle Beach State Park in Washington. The park takes you to a bay beach area that is great for shorebirds and gulls, but also has a path through some fir and deciduous trees on one side and brush with intermittent wet land on the other. This was in the shrubby area. There is a fair amount of road noise from the highway about 1/4 mile away, so you have to turn it up. Merlin doesn't hear the song, but did pick up and ID the Spotted Towhee call at the end. The song was coming from a different brush area than the call, and doesn't strike me as a Towhee song. But again I don't know if it might be a dialect issue. This one I'd really like to ID as it was for the Big Day. You might have to turn the sound way up.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1zk8pyE2Q5QLDJktnrLi6x4qz34vZm0Jt/view?usp=sharing

The second is from yesterday, 10/16/21, Bayocean Spit just west of Tillamook, OR. This is on the bay side as you walk through some old forest area, and in this spot in particular had a lot of nice, medium to tall shrub. Just prior to this Merlin was telling me a lighter chick call was Lincoln's Sparrow, and this one, louder and more of a...solid" chick call as a Fox Sparrow. The habitat is good for Fox, but I never got a visual on either. As my husband says, "can you trust that, almost every bird in the world has that call...." 🙂 But I thought it was worth another listen if anyone feels like it. I've seen Fox Sparrows twice, but never really heard them vocalize with a call.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MWFb3U0oczzxbR2fKj3WkvHM_8kk_yC8/view?usp=sharing

 

Thanks!!

 

Edited by okaugust
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I just want to compliment you on your efforts to learn and share bing songs.  I have birded many places in the world over my many travels and if I have learned one thing about birding guides it is, if I can help it, I would only bird with guides that can bird by sounds.  Many places I have birded were thick, brush and tree covered canyons, mountains etc. and if it were not for the talents of my guides to recognize a bird's call, many I would have missed.  "I hear the bird we are looking for" Carlos would say.  Down a chigger infested canyon trail we would go.  "There it is"!  Click, click goes my camera.

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Thank you 🙂

Back when I first started birding a friend of mine who is a consummate naturalist got me a three CD Peterson's Guide to Western Birdsong. I've recommended it many times over the years though I don't think it's in production any more. My husband and I listened to that CD as if we were learning another language. Usually while we driving, sometimes by osmosis, until my poor husband is so sick of it he groans when I still play it. I've worn out the CD player in the RAV (too many dusty roads in WY) and finally had to move them over to my iTunes and phone. I remember the first time we were standing at Colorado's State Forest State Park and heard a Hermit Thrush, looking at each other "oh, that's on the CD!" and racing back to the car to figure it out. LOL

Later, when I was doing bird guiding as a board member for our local Audubon, I would bird almost exclusively by ear if we weren't getting good lucks, like in high summer when the foliage was thick. It's saved me many a trip down into chigger infested canyons to rule out the chase by being able to ID by ear. More so, in the case of a bird song I don't know, off I go down into that cactus filled snake infested dry river bed after it, because if I don't know the song or call, it's probably new to me. There are also a couple of birds, like a Sprague's Pipit, that we only IDd by audio, never spotted it, but it was important to know because it was an IBA we had just set up. Great grassland breeding range, 40,000 acres!

Being up in the Pac NW the flora is so very dense, if I don't learn the songs sooner rather than later I'll lose my marbles. LOL

Edited by okaugust
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3 minutes ago, Aidan B said:

Both birds are Fox Sparrows. First is the song, second is the call. Always funny hearing Fox Sparrows singing during fall migration. 

Woo, thank you! I'll give the songs some listens to get more familiar with them.

It is funny, there are a lot of birds singing here, particularly Song Sparrows, and yes, fall! Also have some Anna's Hummingbirds at my feeders, one in full breeding plumage. This environmental shift is huge for me, but I'm loving it.

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7 hours ago, Colton V said:

I like birding by ear because it lets me look for other stuff like bugs and mushrooms 😋

And slugs and snails, bears and fox, flowers and....one of the best parts of birding is it teaches you to "see" so much, that you get to get out and find so much else too.

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