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2022 Year Lists!


Kevin
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Looks like I'll be finishing up the year with 396 species. . . I put in a solid effort trying to get too 400, but could not make it happen. Ended up with some great birds though!!! Not bad for only birding in Northern California, outside of one trip to Montana! 

My five biggest misses this year were.

1. Least Tern

2. Black Scoter

3. Black Tern

4. Least Bittern

5. Cassin's Kingbird

 

My ten best birds this year were.

1. Willow Warbler

2. Oriental Turtle-Dove 

3. Brambling 

4. Hawaiian Petrel 

5. Murphy's Petrel

6. Little Gull

7. Tufted Duck

8. Guadalupe Murrelet

9. Red-footed Booby

10. Sharp-tailed Grouse

Edited by Aidan B
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Haven’t totally given up yet.  All the lakes froze over with the storm a week ago.  The warm-up the past couple of days have opened some of them up.  Nothing of note on them though.  I think I’m down to trying for Northern Saw-whet, Long-eared, and Short-eared Owls tomorrow.  My pup and I may try a couple of spots for Pine Siskin.  The river was empty, so no Long-tailed Duck, and I don’t think Black Scoter is going to show up on the inland lakes at this point.  The gulls are pretty much gone also.  

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A NSWO showed up in my yard today (new yard bird!) which brought me to 362. I’m not expecting to add anything tomorrow unless something else crazy shows up in my yard! 
Yesterday I went out birding in the mountains hoping to add between 1-4 species, but had no luck. A good list though overall.

362 beats my previous best of 261 in 2020, but looking back the mid-400s should have been relatively easy having been to four provinces and starting the year in Costa Rica.

Biggest misses for me are barred owl and spruce grouse. The grouse really surprised me as I was out hiking in the mountains far more than any previous year.

Also thinking back to March when I forgot to look for harlequin ducks at one spot and when my brother asked if I wanted to go back to look for them I said “Nah, I’ll see them again later in the year”. Never did 😑

 

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I’m going to finish the year at 306(including non-ABA countable exotics). Last year I finished at 247, so this is a big improvement for me. Maybe I’ll get one more today in Florida, but I doubt it. 
 

My biggest misses for the year: 

Surfbird

White-winged Dove

Limpkin

Laughing Gull

Gray-headed Swamphen

Rufous Hummingbird

There are a couple more big misses and a few more misses that were much harder birds. 
 

My best birds were:(in no particular order)

Wood Warbler

Ovenbird(Orange County, CA)

Williamson’s Sapsucker(in the desert, first Joshua Tree NP record)

Black-throated Green Warbler(Orange County, CA)

Tropical Kingbird(Orange County, CA)

Lapland Longspur(Orange County, CA)

Painted Redstart(Orange County, CA)

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker(Orange County, CA)

Red-footed Booby(Orange County, CA)

Northern Parula(Orange County, CA)

 

Bonus bird: Almost certainly ship-assisted, a Snowy Owl in Orange County, CA. I’m not putting this in the main list since I’m not positive if I’ll count it officially.
 

Out of this list of best birds, only the  WISA was self found. 
 

I had a great year, my best year of birding yet, and look forward to an even better one in 2023! Happy new year!

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21 hours ago, Peromyscus said:

Definitely!! I saw the Red-necked Grebe on the other side of my county that had been reported earlier this month but had not been reported for 2 weeks. Year bird #208. That's probably going to be it for me this year. This has been my best year birding close to home in quite a few years.

 

My worst misses, considering my limited area of birding, were Yellow-throated Warbler, Grasshopper Sparrow, and Dickcissel, all of them breeding species.

My best species were Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, MacGillivray's Warbler, Whimbrel, Eared Grebe, and Red-necked Grebe.

My best self-found species were a spring Snowy Egret, and the first Least Flycatchers I've seen & heard near my house in decades.

Maybe I'll resolve to exceed this year's species total in 2023, in the same area I birded in this year.

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2 hours ago, BirdNrd said:

I ended at 315 with a recent trip to Orange County (California) that got me a few more. That’s 10 more than 2020 but 14 less than 2021.

Also,

My biggest misses were: Cassin's Sparrow, Red Phalarope, and Common Tern

Best birds were: Tundra Swans, Harris's Sparrows, Parakeet Auklet, Ruff, Short-tailed Shearwater, American Golden-Plover, self-found Black-throated Green Warbler, Philadelphia Vireo, two self-found Black-throated Blue Warblers, Prairie Warbler, Wood Warbler, Broad-billed Hummingbird, Great Crested Flycatcher, Yellow-throated Vireo, Grace's Warbler, Nelson's Sparrow, King Eiders, Mexican Duck, Ovenbird (and of course the Snowy Owl).

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Looks like I'm going to finish the year with 235 species. A personal best (and even better for basically not having left the state of Michigan the whole year. I look forward to another great year of birding. 

My most shameful misses were: Ruffed Grouse and Great Black-backed Gull. Should have had both of these fellows.

My best birds were: December White-rumped Sandpiper, Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, White Ibis, and King Rail. (Haha now that I'm thinking about it I got all these rarities at the same location)

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I haven’t really had any misses due to not really chasing anything because of age(young!).


My best birds were: Eastern Kingbird(rare for SD), Northern Shoveler,   Orchard Oriole(finally attracted one with the old orange skewer technique!), Ruby-Throated Hummingbird, Yellow-Bellied Flycatcher(probably one of my best birds.), Little Blue Heron(that one was pretty glorious too.), and last, but definitely not least: Great Egret.

Edited by Snake Fingers
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7 hours ago, IKLland said:

I’m going to finish the year at 306(including non-ABA countable exotics). Last year I finished at 247, so this is a big improvement for me. Maybe I’ll get one more today in Florida, but I doubt it. 
 

My biggest misses for the year: 

Surfbird

White-winged Dove

Limpkin

Laughing Gull

Gray-headed Swamphen

Rufous Hummingbird

There are a couple more big misses and a few more misses that were much harder birds. 
 

My best birds were:(in no particular order)

Wood Warbler

Ovenbird(Orange County, CA)

Williamson’s Sapsucker(in the desert, first Joshua Tree NP record)

Black-throated Green Warbler(Orange County, CA)

Tropical Kingbird(Orange County, CA)

Lapland Longspur(Orange County, CA)

Painted Redstart(Orange County, CA)

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker(Orange County, CA)

Red-footed Booby(Orange County, CA)

Northern Parula(Orange County, CA)

 

Bonus bird: Almost certainly ship-assisted, a Snowy Owl in Orange County, CA. I’m not putting this in the main list since I’m not positive if I’ll count it officially.
 

Out of this list of best birds, only the  WISA was self found. 
 

I had a great year, my best year of birding yet, and look forward to an even better one in 2023! Happy new year!

I should point out that I only birded in Southern California(mostly Orange and Los Angeles Counties), New York(but very little actual birding outside of the neighborhoods and  beach as it wasn’t  a birding trip), and Palm Beach County, Florida. 

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Trying not to feel a little disappointed.  I thought for sure I'd get to 220 in my county, but have gone 0-6 weeks on FOY.  Still 218 is a new high by 6.  I tried to hit up the Short-eared Owl spot, but some deer hunters gave me some crap.  By that time was too late to try another spot I've wanted to try.  

County overall had best number at 226, so I only missed 8 birds here.  That is my best year as far as that goes also.  I usually miss by around 15 birds.  2 misses, Yellow-breasted Chat and Henslow's Sparrow, I should have had, but they popped out while I was right in middle of "The sickness".  So by time I could chase they were gone.  

I had 14 really rare birds (what I classify as Code 4-6).  I usually average around 7 of those.  Previous high was 11, last year.  

Highlight birds for the county

  1. Golden Eagle - yard bird
  2. White-winged Crossbill - county lifer
  3. Snowy Owl
  4. Whimbrel - self-found first county record
  5. Long-billed Dowitcher (multiple birds)
  6. Black-necked Stilt - 2nd county record after finding 1st record last year
  7. Black-bellied Plover
  8. Franklin's Gull
  9. White-rumped Sandpiper (these last 3 birds were found within 1/2 mile and 5 minutes of each other, incredibly rare birds for this county)
  10. Red-necked Phalarope - self-found first county record
  11. American Avocet - 2nd county record

Trip to N.C. got me 36 other species, for 254 for the year.  2nd best overall year.  It also got me 7 lifers in Swainson's Warbler, Clapper Rail, Gray Kingbird, Mississippi Kite, Cattle Egret, and Northern Bobwhite.  

Edited by chipperatl
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1 hour ago, IKLland said:

I should point out that I only birded in Southern California(mostly Orange and Los Angeles Counties), New York(but very little actual birding outside of the neighborhoods and  beach as it wasn’t  a birding trip), and Palm Beach County, Florida. 

Nice! I was only able to bird central (and a tiny bit of southern) California. 

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2022 End-of-Year Report

2022 has been a great year for me for watching and photographing birds. I maintained a perfect streak, making a checklist every single day of the year.

I saw a total of 368 species this year, of which 68 were lifers, increasing my life list to 411. Due to the way eBird currently counts exotics and uncountable birds (of which I got 4 in the ABA area), these counts include them. In Clark County, Nevada, I saw 227 species this year, which put me squarely at #20.

It's highly unlikely I'm going to have another year with 60+ lifers within the ABA area unless I have a lot of time and money. The majority of this year's lifers were fairly common, but there were a few noteworthy individuals (rare or reclusive), especially given where they were sighted (all in Clark County, Nevada, unless noted):

  • Tundra Swan
  • Mexican Duck
  • Barrow's Goldeneye (Utah County, Utah)
  • Ruffed Grouse (Rich County, Utah)
  • African Collared-Dove
  • Violet-crowned Hummingbird (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Black-legged Kittiwake
  • Yellow-footed Gull
  • Black Tern
  • Pacific Loon
  • Cory's Shearwater (Washington County, Rhode Island)
  • Great Shearwater (Suffolk County, New York)
  • Golden Eagle (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Gray Hawk (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Arizona Woodpecker (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • California Gnatcatcher (Orange County, California)
  • California Thrasher (Orange County, California)
  • Rufous-backed Robin
  • Bohemian Waxwing
  • Fox Sparrow
  • Dickcissel

I took a total of 6 trips this year, visiting 9 total states (including my home state of Nevada): two to South Carolina (one with Georgia), one to Arizona, one to Rhode Island & New York, one to Utah (plus Idaho), and one to Southern California (plus Arizona). All trips were with someone and within the United States.

 

Here's a breakdown by month. Trip links go to the trip report.

Month Month
Total
YTD New Major Trips
January 166 166 166 South Carolina & Georgia
February 82 181 15  
March 157 235 54 Tucson, Arizona
April 119 255 20  
May 155 281 26  
June 121 309 28 South Carolina
July 95 317 8 Port Jefferson, NY & Newport, RI
August 131 327 10 (continued from July)
September 72 330 3  
October 128 339 9 Utah & Idaho
November 153 366 27 Southern California
December 101 368 2  

Breakdown of species by state:

State Species
Nevada 229
California 146
South Carolina 128
Arizona 127
Utah 101
New York 68
Georgia 59
Rhode Island 52
Idaho 33

Full bird list. Those in red were lifers.

Quote
  • Waterfowl
    • Snow Goose
    • Ross's Goose
    • Swan Goose
    • Greater White-fronted Goose
    • Brant
    • Cackling Goose
    • Canada Goose
    • Mute Swan
    • Tundra Swan
    • Egyptian Goose
    • Muscovy Duck
    • Wood Duck
    • Blue-winged Teal
    • Cinnamon Teal
    • Northern Shoveler
    • Gadwall
    • American Wigeon
    • Mallard
    • Mexican Duck
    • Northern Pintail
    • Green-winged Teal
    • Canvasback
    • Redhead
    • Ring-necked Duck
    • Greater Scaup
    • Lesser Scaup
    • Common Eider
    • Surf Scoter
    • Bufflehead
    • Common Goldeneye
    • Barrow's Goldeneye
    • Hooded Merganser
    • Common Merganser
    • Red-breasted Merganser
    • Ruddy Duck
  • Grouse, Quail, and Allies
    • Northern Bobwhite
    • California Quail
    • Gambel's Quail
    • Wild Turkey
    • Ruffed Grouse
    • Ring-necked Pheasant
    • Indian Peafowl
  • Grebes
    • Pied-billed Grebe
    • Horned Grebe
    • Eared Grebe
    • Western Grebe
    • Clark's Grebe
  • Pigeons & Doves
    • Rock Pigeon
    • Eurasian Collared-Dove
    • African Collared-Dove
    • Inca Dove
    • Common Ground Dove
    • White-winged Dove
    • Mourning Dove
  • Cuckoos
    • Greater Roadrunner
    • Yellow-billed Cuckoo
  • Nightjars
    • Lesser Nighthawk
    • Chuck-will's-widow
  • Swifts
    • Chimney Swift
    • White-throated Swift
  • Hummingbirds
    • Rivoli's Hummingbird
    • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
    • Black-chinned Hummingbird
    • Anna's Hummingbird
    • Costa's Hummingbird
    • Rufous Hummingbird
    • Allen's Hummingbird
    • Broad-tailed Hummingbird
    • Broad-billed Hummingbird
    • Violet-crowned Hummingbird
  • Rails
    • Virginia Rail
    • Sora
    • Common Gallinule
    • American Coot
  • Cranes
    • Sandhill Crane
  • Shorebirds
    • Black-necked Stilt
    • American Avocet
    • American Oystercatcher
    • Black Oystercatcher
    • Black-bellied Plover
    • Wilson's Plover
    • Semipalmated Plover
    • Piping Plover
    • Killdeer
    • Whimbrel
    • Long-billed Curlew
    • Marbled Godwit
    • Ruddy Turnstone
    • Black Turnstone
    • Sanderling
    • Dunlin
    • Least Sandpiper
    • Pectoral Sandpiper
    • Semipalmated Sandpiper
    • Western Sandpiper
    • Short-billed Dowitcher
    • Long-billed Dowitcher
    • Wilson's Snipe
    • Wilson's Phalarope
    • Red-necked Phalarope
    • Spotted Sandpiper
    • Solitary Sandpiper
    • Greater Yellowlegs
    • Willet
    • Lesser Yellowlegs
  • Gulls and Terns
    • Black-legged Kittiwake
    • Bonaparte's Gull
    • Laughing Gull
    • Franklin's Gull
    • Heermann's Gull
    • Ring-billed Gull
    • Western Gull
    • Yellow-footed Gull
    • California Gull
    • Herring Gull
    • Iceland Gull
    • Lesser Black-backed Gull
    • Great Black-backed Gull
    • Least Tern
    • Caspian Tern
    • Black Tern
    • Roseate Tern
    • Common Tern
    • Forster's Tern
    • Royal Tern
    • Sandwich Tern
  • Loons
    • Pacific Loon
    • Common Loon
  • Storm-Petrels
    • Wilson's Storm-Petrel
  • Petrels and Shearwaters
    • Cory's Shearwater
    • Great Shearwater
  • Storks
    • Wood Stork
  • Cormorants and Anhingas
    • Anhinga
    • Brandt's Cormorant
    • Double-crested Cormorant
    • Neotropic Cormorant
  • Pelicans
    • American White Pelican
    • Brown Pelican
  • Herons and Ibises
    • American Bittern
    • Least Bittern
    • Great Blue Heron
    • Great Egret
    • Snowy Egret
    • Little Blue Heron
    • Tricolored Heron
    • Reddish Egret
    • Cattle Egret
    • Green Heron
    • Black-crowned Night-Heron
    • Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
    • White Ibis
    • White-faced Ibis
  • Vultures, Hawks, and Allies
    • Black Vulture
    • Turkey Vulture
    • Osprey
    • Swallow-tailed Kite
    • Golden Eagle
    • Mississippi Kite
    • Northern Harrier
    • Sharp-shinned Hawk
    • Cooper's Hawk
    • Bald Eagle
    • Common Black Hawk
    • Gray Hawk
    • Red-shouldered Hawk
    • Zone-tailed Hawk
    • Red-tailed Hawk
  • Owls
    • Great Horned Owl
    • Burrowing Owl
    • Barred Owl
  • Kingfishers
    • Belted Kingfisher
  • Woodpeckers
    • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
    • Red-naped Sapsucker
    • Lewis's Woodpecker
    • Red-headed Woodpecker
    • Acorn Woodpecker
    • Gila Woodpecker
    • Red-bellied Woodpecker
    • Downy Woodpecker
    • Nuttall's Woodpecker
    • Ladder-backed Woodpecker
    • Hairy Woodpecker
    • Arizona Woodpecker
    • Pileated Woodpecker
    • Northern Flicker
    • Gilded Flicker
  • Falcons
    • American Kestrel
    • Merlin
    • Peregrine Falcon
    • Prairie Falcon
  • Tyrant Flycatchers
    • Olive-sided Flycatcher
    • Western Wood-Pewee
    • Eastern Wood-Pewee
    • Acadian Flycatcher
    • Willow Flycatcher
    • Hammond's Flycatcher
    • Gray Flycatcher
    • Dusky Flycatcher
    • Pacific-slope Flycatcher
    • Cordilleran Flycatcher
    • Black Phoebe
    • Eastern Phoebe
    • Say's Phoebe
    • Vermilion Flycatcher
    • Ash-throated Flycatcher
    • Great Crested Flycatcher
    • Brown-crested Flycatcher
    • Cassin's Kingbird
    • Western Kingbird
    • Eastern Kingbird
  • Vireos
    • White-eyed Vireo
    • Cassin's Vireo
    • Blue-headed Vireo
    • Plumbeous Vireo
    • Warbling Vireo
    • Red-eyed Vireo
  • Shrikes
    • Loggerhead Shrike
  • Corvids
    • Steller's Jay
    • Blue Jay
    • California Scrub-Jay
    • Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay
    • Mexican Jay
    • Black-billed Magpie
    • Clark's Nutcracker
    • American Crow
    • Fish Crow
    • Chihuahuan Raven
    • Common Raven
  • Chickadees and Titmice
    • Carolina Chickadee
    • Black-capped Chickadee
    • Mountain Chickadee
    • Bridled Titmouse
    • Oak Titmouse
    • Juniper Titmouse
    • Tufted Titmouse
  • Penduline-Tits
    • Verdin
  • Larks
    • Horned Lark
  • Swallows
    • Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    • Purple Martin
    • Tree Swallow
    • Violet-green Swallow
    • Bank Swallow
    • Barn Swallow
    • Cliff Swallow
  • Long-tailed Tits
    • Bushtit
  • Parrotbills
    • Wrentit
  • White-eyes
    • Swinhoe's White-eye
  • Kinglets
    • Ruby-crowned Kinglet
    • Golden-crowned Kinglet
  • Nuthatches
    • Red-breasted Nuthatch
    • White-breasted Nuthatch
    • Pygmy Nuthatch
    • Brown-headed Nuthatch
  • Treecreepers
    • Brown Creeper
  • Gnatcatchers
    • Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    • Black-tailed Gnatcatcher
    • California Gnatcatcher
  • Wrens
    • Rock Wren
    • House Wren
    • Winter Wren
    • Marsh Wren
    • Carolina Wren
    • Bewick's Wren
    • Cactus Wren
  • Dippers
    • American Dipper
  • Starlings and Mynas
    • European Starling
  • Mimids
    • Gray Catbird
    • Curve-billed Thrasher
    • Brown Thrasher
    • California Thrasher
    • Crissal Thrasher
    • Sage Thrasher
    • Northern Mockingbird
  • Thrushes
    • Eastern Bluebird
    • Western Bluebird
    • Mountain Bluebird
    • Townsend's Solitaire
    • Varied Thrush
    • Hermit Thrush
    • Wood Thrush
    • American Robin
    • Rufous-backed Robin
  • Waxwings
    • Bohemian Waxwing
    • Cedar Waxwing
  • Silky-Flycatchers
    • Phainopepla
  • Olive Warbler
    • Olive Warbler
  • Estrildids
    • Scaly-breasted Munia
  • Indigobirds
    • Pin-tailed Whydah
  • Old World Sparrows
    • House Sparrow
  • Wagtails and Pipits
    • American Pipit
  • Finches
    • Evening Grosbeak
    • House Finch
    • Cassin's Finch
    • Red Crossbill
    • Pine Siskin
    • Lesser Goldfinch
    • American Goldfinch
  • New World Sparrows
    • Rufous-winged Sparrow
    • Chipping Sparrow
    • Brewer's Sparrow
    • Black-throated Sparrow
    • Lark Sparrow
    • Fox Sparrow
    • Dark-eyed Junco
    • Yellow-eyed Junco
    • White-crowned Sparrow
    • Harris's Sparrow
    • White-throated Sparrow
    • Bell's Sparrow
    • Savannah Sparrow
    • Song Sparrow
    • Lincoln's Sparrow
    • Swamp Sparrow
    • Abert's Towhee
    • California Towhee
    • Green-tailed Towhee
    • Spotted Towhee
    • Eastern Towhee
  • Yellow-breasted Chat
    • Yellow-breasted Chat
  • Blackbirds
    • Yellow-headed Blackbird
    • Western Meadowlark
    • Eastern Meadowlark
    • Orchard Oriole
    • Hooded Oriole
    • Bullock's Oriole
    • Baltimore Oriole
    • Scott's Oriole
    • Red-winged Blackbird
    • Bronzed Cowbird
    • Brown-headed Cowbird
    • Rusty Blackbird
    • Brewer's Blackbird
    • Common Grackle
    • Boat-tailed Grackle
    • Great-tailed Grackle
  • Wood-Warblers
    • Black-and-white Warbler
    • Prothonotary Warbler
    • Orange-crowned Warbler
    • Lucy's Warbler
    • Nashville Warbler
    • Virginia's Warbler
    • MacGillivray's Warbler
    • Common Yellowthroat
    • Hooded Warbler
    • American Redstart
    • Northern Parula
    • Yellow Warbler
    • Palm Warbler
    • Pine Warbler
    • Yellow-rumped Warbler
    • Yellow-throated Warbler
    • Prairie Warbler
    • Black-throated Gray Warbler
    • Townsend's Warbler
    • Hermit Warbler
    • Wilson's Warbler
  • Cardinals, Grosbeaks, and Allies
    • Hepatic Tanager
    • Summer Tanager
    • Western Tanager
    • Northern Cardinal
    • Pyrrhuloxia
    • Rose-breasted Grosbeak
    • Black-headed Grosbeak
    • Blue Grosbeak
    • Lazuli Bunting
    • Indigo Bunting
    • Painted Bunting
    • Dickcissel

 

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2 hours ago, Zoroark said:

2022 End-of-Year Report

2022 has been a great year for me for watching and photographing birds. I maintained a perfect streak, making a checklist every single day of the year.

I saw a total of 368 species this year, of which 68 were lifers, increasing my life list to 411. Due to the way eBird currently counts exotics and uncountable birds (of which I got 4 in the ABA area), these counts include them. In Clark County, Nevada, I saw 227 species this year, which put me squarely at #20.

It's highly unlikely I'm going to have another year with 60+ lifers within the ABA area unless I have a lot of time and money. The majority of this year's lifers were fairly common, but there were a few noteworthy individuals (rare or reclusive), especially given where they were sighted (all in Clark County, Nevada, unless noted):

  • Tundra Swan
  • Mexican Duck
  • Barrow's Goldeneye (Utah County, Utah)
  • Ruffed Grouse (Rich County, Utah)
  • African Collared-Dove
  • Violet-crowned Hummingbird (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Black-legged Kittiwake
  • Yellow-footed Gull
  • Black Tern
  • Pacific Loon
  • Cory's Shearwater (Washington County, Rhode Island)
  • Great Shearwater (Suffolk County, New York)
  • Golden Eagle (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Gray Hawk (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Arizona Woodpecker (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • California Gnatcatcher (Orange County, California)
  • California Thrasher (Orange County, California)
  • Rufous-backed Robin
  • Bohemian Waxwing
  • Fox Sparrow
  • Dickcissel

I took a total of 6 trips this year, visiting 9 total states (including my home state of Nevada): two to South Carolina (one with Georgia), one to Arizona, one to Rhode Island & New York, one to Utah (plus Idaho), and one to Southern California (plus Arizona). All trips were with someone and within the United States.

 

Here's a breakdown by month. Trip links go to the trip report.

Month Month
Total
YTD New Major Trips
January 166 166 166 South Carolina & Georgia
February 82 181 15  
March 157 235 54 Tucson, Arizona
April 119 255 20  
May 155 281 26  
June 121 309 28 South Carolina
July 95 317 8 Port Jefferson, NY & Newport, RI
August 131 327 10 (continued from July)
September 72 330 3  
October 128 339 9 Utah & Idaho
November 153 366 27 Southern California
December 101 368 2  

Breakdown of species by state:

State Species
Nevada 229
California 146
South Carolina 128
Arizona 127
Utah 101
New York 68
Georgia 59
Rhode Island 52
Idaho 33

Full bird list. Those in red were lifers.

 

Wow.

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9 hours ago, Zoroark said:

2022 End-of-Year Report

2022 has been a great year for me for watching and photographing birds. I maintained a perfect streak, making a checklist every single day of the year.

I saw a total of 368 species this year, of which 68 were lifers, increasing my life list to 411. Due to the way eBird currently counts exotics and uncountable birds (of which I got 4 in the ABA area), these counts include them. In Clark County, Nevada, I saw 227 species this year, which put me squarely at #20.

It's highly unlikely I'm going to have another year with 60+ lifers within the ABA area unless I have a lot of time and money. The majority of this year's lifers were fairly common, but there were a few noteworthy individuals (rare or reclusive), especially given where they were sighted (all in Clark County, Nevada, unless noted):

  • Tundra Swan
  • Mexican Duck
  • Barrow's Goldeneye (Utah County, Utah)
  • Ruffed Grouse (Rich County, Utah)
  • African Collared-Dove
  • Violet-crowned Hummingbird (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Black-legged Kittiwake
  • Yellow-footed Gull
  • Black Tern
  • Pacific Loon
  • Cory's Shearwater (Washington County, Rhode Island)
  • Great Shearwater (Suffolk County, New York)
  • Golden Eagle (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Gray Hawk (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • Arizona Woodpecker (Santa Cruz County, Arizona)
  • California Gnatcatcher (Orange County, California)
  • California Thrasher (Orange County, California)
  • Rufous-backed Robin
  • Bohemian Waxwing
  • Fox Sparrow
  • Dickcissel

I took a total of 6 trips this year, visiting 9 total states (including my home state of Nevada): two to South Carolina (one with Georgia), one to Arizona, one to Rhode Island & New York, one to Utah (plus Idaho), and one to Southern California (plus Arizona). All trips were with someone and within the United States.

 

Here's a breakdown by month. Trip links go to the trip report.

Month Month
Total
YTD New Major Trips
January 166 166 166 South Carolina & Georgia
February 82 181 15  
March 157 235 54 Tucson, Arizona
April 119 255 20  
May 155 281 26  
June 121 309 28 South Carolina
July 95 317 8 Port Jefferson, NY & Newport, RI
August 131 327 10 (continued from July)
September 72 330 3  
October 128 339 9 Utah & Idaho
November 153 366 27 Southern California
December 101 368 2  

Breakdown of species by state:

State Species
Nevada 229
California 146
South Carolina 128
Arizona 127
Utah 101
New York 68
Georgia 59
Rhode Island 52
Idaho 33

Full bird list. Those in red were lifers.

 

Wowza, nice list!

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