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2022 Year Lists!


Kevin
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17 hours ago, stitch58 said:

Got up to 201 earlier this week. Number 200 was Worm-eating Warbler. We've got a Garganey Drake being seen here in NJ. Hoping to see it tomorrow for my second lifer of the year.

I also passed 200 species for the year earlier this week and now sitting at 203.

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I’m stuck in upper 190s. 198 to be exact. I haven’t been able to bird much lately, but I should have a ton of time coming up. Of course the time I have to bird isn’t during migration. Just waiting for July and August for shorebird migration to start! 

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On 6/2/2022 at 5:50 PM, stitch58 said:

Got up to 201 earlier this week. Number 200 was Worm-eating Warbler. We've got a Garganey Drake being seen here in NJ. Hoping to see it tomorrow for my second lifer of the year.

Went to see the Garganey today. It's been hanging out on a small pond which is on the grounds of a National Guard training base which is off limits to the general public but people have been viewing it from an adjacent ball field. Ten minutes before I arrived it was out in clear view but then flew behind a small island where no one could see it. I waited patiently for it to come out again but after 4 hours still no go. I ran out of time & had to leave & of course I got a text alert 20 minutes later that it was back out 🤪. Hopefully it will stick around & I'll get another chance.

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Sitting at 240 overall, 205 for county.  I'd like to beat my highs of 273/212 for each.  Not sure I want to push for 300 though.  Gas needs to become less mental to think about that.  I may have to put a spreadsheet together and see if some short trips could knock that up some.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/23/2022 at 1:11 PM, Connor Cochrane said:

Just getting on the plane back from Texas, at 404 for the year right now in the ABA. Im visiting family in Colorado and Massachusetts later this year so will have opportunities to add a few more. Im predicting I’ll end the year around 500 

I see you are in the Top 100 ABA.  500 should keep you close to staying in it.  Very impressive!

Edited by chipperatl
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/3/2022 at 3:06 PM, Aaron said:

I managed to get to 306 this week.  Got me wondering if it’s possible to get to 400 but that seems like too much effort 

I'm in the same boat. 350 would be a solid goal for the year, but 400 would definitely require a trip to somewhere inland out east during the fall migration, and a good California coast trip as well.

 

Also, @Kevin this thread should probably be moved to the General Birding Topics board. 🙂

Edited by Zoroark
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I’ve entered my first slump of the year it seems. Only have added three species in the last 3 weeks and thought I’d have my lifers black tern, yellow rail, alder flycatcher, and rose-breasted grosbeak by now. 
Still quite a few birds around still that I’m missing for this year but can’t seem to find the time to go out birding….

Getting a lot of FOMO from the needs alert emails 😔

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5 hours ago, Aaron said:

I’ve entered my first slump of the year it seems. Only have added three species in the last 3 weeks and thought I’d have my lifers black tern, yellow rail, alder flycatcher, and rose-breasted grosbeak by now. 
Still quite a few birds around still that I’m missing for this year but can’t seem to find the time to go out birding….

Getting a lot of FOMO from the needs alert emails 😔

Right there with you.  Just not as many alerts here though.  Dipped on Henslow’s Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow, and Dickcissel last week.  

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20 hours ago, chipperatl said:

Right there with you.  Just not as many alerts here though.  Dipped on Henslow’s Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow, and Dickcissel last week.  

Dipped again on Grasshopper Sparrow.  Henslow's aren't in the spots I'd hope to find them.  Dipped on Dickcissel seen this morning, but found a gaggle of them about a mile away.  So just over a month since last FOY to get #206.  

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2022 Mid-Year Report

Month

Month
Total
YTD New Major Trips
January 163 163 +163 South Carolina & Georgia
February 82 178 +15  
March 155 232 +54 Southeast Arizona
April 116 252 +20  
May 155 278 +26  
June 121 306 +28 South Carolina

The year started off really strong with an almost immediate trip to South Carolina and Georgia. Winter in Clark County (Nevada) is already very strong, with 100+ species possible in a normal year, which was bolstered with many eastern species. In March, a trip to southeast Arizona filled in lots of species unique to the area. I spent the rest of spring going to the usual places (especially Corn Creek) to get lots of rarities. A summertime trip to South Carolina, while muggy, provided a good number of additional birds to pad the list.

My total so far for the year is 306 species, which I honestly think is pretty impressive for only taking three vacations, two of which were to the same location in different seasons, and none were a road trip (i.e. staying in a different place most nights).

Additional trips planned for this year:

  • Long Island + Rhode Island; includes boat trips with opportunities for pelagic species
  • Potentially, a trip to southern California and/or some of the national parks in Utah when it cools off
  • A few day trips, especially up the mountain

Major targets by area (in no particular order):

  • New York & Rhode Island
    • Black-capped Chickadee
    • Baltimore Oriole
    • Common Tern
    • Common Eider
    • Black Scoter
    • Piping Plover
    • Semipalmated Plover
    • Semipalmated Sandpiper
    • Glossy Ibis
    • Purple Martin
    • Short-billed Dowitcher
    • Ruddy Turnstone
    • Bobolink
    • American Black Duck
    • Wilson's Storm-Petrel (pelagic)
    • Cory's Shearwater (pelagic)
    • Great Shearwater (pelagic)
  • Nevada (definitely running out of easy targets)
    • Red-breasted Nuthatch
    • Clark's Nutcracker
    • Lesser Nighthawk
    • Bell's Vireo
    • Canyon Wren
    • Black-chinned Sparrow
    • Sagebrush Sparrow
    • Pinyon Jay
    • LeConte's Thrasher
  • California/Utah
    • Too many to list; I'll go through these more when I get confirmation of a trip later this year

Biggest misses (birds I won't get another chance at this year, mostly because I'm not going to Florida):

  • South Carolina
    • Clapper Rail
    • Black Skimmer
    • Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
    • Yellow-throated Vireo
    • Roseate Spoonbill
    • Gull-billed Tern
    • Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
  • Arizona (many of the birds I missed can be gotten in California)
    • Canyon Towhee
    • Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet
    • Rose-throated Becard (tried following a Rare Bird Alert)
    • Ruddy Ground Dove (tried following a Rare Bird Alert)

2022 mid-year list:

Quote
  • Waterfowl
    • Snow Goose
    • Ross's Goose
    • Greater White-fronted Goose
    • Cackling Goose
    • Canada Goose
    • Mute Swan
    • Wood Duck
    • Blue-winged Teal
    • Cinnamon Teal
    • Northern Shoveler
    • Gadwall
    • American Wigeon
    • Mallard
    • Mexican Duck
    • Northern Pintail
    • Green-winged Teal
    • Canvasback
    • Redhead
    • Ring-necked Duck
    • Greater Scaup
    • Lesser Scaup
    • Bufflehead
    • Common Goldeneye
    • Hooded Merganser
    • Common Merganser
    • Red-breasted Merganser
    • Ruddy Duck
  • Grouse, Quail, and Allies
    • Northern Bobwhite
    • Gambel's Quail
    • Wild Turkey
  • Grebes
    • Pied-billed Grebe
    • Horned Grebe
    • Eared Grebe
    • Western Grebe
    • Clark's Grebe
  • Pigeons and Doves
    • Rock Pigeon
    • Eurasian Collared-Dove
    • African Collared-Dove
    • Inca Dove
    • Common Ground Dove
    • White-winged Dove
    • Mourning Dove
  • Cuckoos
    • Greater Roadrunner
    • Yellow-billed Cuckoo
  • Nightjars
    • Chuck-will's-widow
  • Swifts
    • Chimney Swift
    • White-throated Swift
  • Hummingbirds
    • Rivoli's Hummingbird
    • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
    • Black-chinned Hummingbird
    • Anna's Hummingbird
    • Costa's Hummingbird
    • Rufous Hummingbird
    • Broad-tailed Hummingbird
    • Broad-billed Hummingbird
    • Violet-crowned Hummingbird
  • Rails, Gallinules, and Allies
    • Virginia Rail
    • Sora
    • Common Gallinule
    • American Coot
  • Shorebirds
    • Black-necked Stilt
    • American Avocet
    • American Oystercatcher
    • Black-bellied Plover
    • Wilson's Plover
    • Killdeer
    • Sanderling
    • Dunlin
    • Least Sandpiper
    • Western Sandpiper
    • Long-billed Dowitcher
    • Wilson's Snipe
    • Wilson's Phalarope
    • Red-necked Phalarope
    • Spotted Sandpiper
    • Solitary Sandpiper
    • Greater Yellowlegs
    • Willet
    • Lesser Yellowlegs
  • Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers
    • Black-legged Kittiwake
    • Bonaparte's Gull
    • Laughing Gull
    • Franklin's Gull
    • Ring-billed Gull
    • Yellow-footed Gull
    • California Gull
    • Herring Gull
    • Iceland Gull
    • Lesser Black-backed Gull
    • Great Black-backed Gull
    • Least Tern
    • Forster's Tern
    • Royal Tern
    • Sandwich Tern
  • Loons
    • Pacific Loon
    • Common Loon
  • Storks
    • Wood Stork
  • Cormorants and Anhingas
    • Anhinga
    • Double-crested Cormorant
    • Neotropic Cormorant
  • Pelicans
    • American White Pelican
    • Brown Pelican
  • Herons, Ibises, and Allies
    • American Bittern
    • Least Bittern
    • Great Blue Heron
    • Great Egret
    • Snowy Egret
    • Little Blue Heron
    • Tricolored Heron
    • Cattle Egret
    • Green Heron
    • Black-crowned Night-Heron
    • White Ibis
    • White-faced Ibis
  • Vultures, Hawks, and Allies
    • Black Vulture
    • Turkey Vulture
    • Osprey
    • Swallow-tailed Kite
    • Golden Eagle
    • Mississippi Kite
    • Northern Harrier
    • Sharp-shinned Hawk
    • Cooper's Hawk
    • Bald Eagle
    • Common Black Hawk
    • Gray Hawk
    • Red-shouldered Hawk
    • Zone-tailed Hawk
    • Red-tailed Hawk
  • Owls
    • Great Horned Owl
    • Burrowing Owl
    • Barred Owl
  • Kingfishers
    • Belted Kingfisher
  • Woodpeckers
    • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
    • Red-naped Sapsucker
    • Lewis's Woodpecker
    • Red-headed Woodpecker
    • Acorn Woodpecker
    • Gila Woodpecker
    • Red-bellied Woodpecker
    • Downy Woodpecker
    • Ladder-backed Woodpecker
    • Hairy Woodpecker
    • Arizona Woodpecker
    • Pileated Woodpecker
    • Northern Flicker
    • Gilded Flicker
  • Falcons and Caracaras
    • American Kestrel
    • Merlin
    • Peregrine Falcon
    • Prairie Falcon
  • Tyrant Flycatchers and Allies
    • Olive-sided Flycatcher
    • Western Wood-Pewee
    • Eastern Wood-Pewee
    • Acadian Flycatcher
    • Willow Flycatcher
    • Hammond's Flycatcher
    • Gray Flycatcher
    • Dusky Flycatcher
    • Pacific-slope Flycatcher
    • Cordilleran Flycatcher
    • Black Phoebe
    • Eastern Phoebe
    • Say's Phoebe
    • Vermilion Flycatcher
    • Ash-throated Flycatcher
    • Great Crested Flycatcher
    • Brown-crested Flycatcher
    • Western Kingbird
    • Eastern Kingbird
  • Vireos
    • White-eyed Vireo
    • Cassin's Vireo
    • Blue-headed Vireo
    • Plumbeous Vireo
    • Warbling Vireo
    • Red-eyed Vireo
  • Shrikes
    • Loggerhead Shrike
  • Corvids
    • Steller's Jay
    • Blue Jay
    • Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay
    • Mexican Jay
    • American Crow
    • Fish Crow
    • Chihuahuan Raven
    • Common Raven
  • Chickadees and Titmice
    • Carolina Chickadee
    • Mountain Chickadee
    • Bridled Titmouse
    • Juniper Titmouse
    • Tufted Titmouse
  • Penduline-Tits
    • Verdin
  • Larks
    • Horned Lark
  • Martins and Swallows
    • Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    • Tree Swallow
    • Violet-green Swallow
    • Bank Swallow
    • Barn Swallow
    • Cliff Swallow
  • Long-tailed Tits
    • Bushtit
  • Kinglets
    • Ruby-crowned Kinglet
    • Golden-crowned Kinglet
  • Nuthatches
    • White-breasted Nuthatch
    • Pygmy Nuthatch
    • Brown-headed Nuthatch
  • Treecreepers
    • Brown Creeper
  • Gnatcatchers
    • Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    • Black-tailed Gnatcatcher
  • Wrens
    • Rock Wren
    • House Wren
    • Winter Wren
    • Marsh Wren
    • Carolina Wren
    • Bewick's Wren
    • Cactus Wren
  • Starlings and Mynas
    • European Starling
  • Mimids
    • Gray Catbird
    • Curve-billed Thrasher
    • Brown Thrasher
    • Crissal Thrasher
    • Sage Thrasher
    • Northern Mockingbird
  • Thrushes
    • Eastern Bluebird
    • Western Bluebird
    • Mountain Bluebird
    • Townsend's Solitaire
    • Varied Thrush
    • Hermit Thrush
    • Wood Thrush
    • American Robin
    • Rufous-backed Robin
  • Waxwings
    • Cedar Waxwing
  • Silky-Flycatchers
    • Phainopepla
  • Olive Warbler
    • Olive Warbler
  • Old World Sparrows
    • House Sparrow
  • Wagtails and Pipits
    • American Pipit
  • Finches and Allies
    • House Finch
    • Cassin's Finch
    • Pine Siskin
    • Lesser Goldfinch
    • American Goldfinch
  • New World Sparrows
    • Rufous-winged Sparrow
    • Chipping Sparrow
    • Brewer's Sparrow
    • Black-throated Sparrow
    • Lark Sparrow
    • Dark-eyed Junco
    • Yellow-eyed Junco
    • White-crowned Sparrow
    • Harris's Sparrow
    • White-throated Sparrow
    • Bell's Sparrow
    • Savannah Sparrow
    • Song Sparrow
    • Lincoln's Sparrow
    • Swamp Sparrow
    • Abert's Towhee
    • Green-tailed Towhee
    • Spotted Towhee
    • Eastern Towhee
  • Yellow-breasted Chat
    • Yellow-breasted Chat
  • Blackbirds
    • Yellow-headed Blackbird
    • Western Meadowlark
    • Eastern Meadowlark
    • Orchard Oriole
    • Hooded Oriole
    • Bullock's Oriole
    • Scott's Oriole
    • Red-winged Blackbird
    • Bronzed Cowbird
    • Brown-headed Cowbird
    • Rusty Blackbird
    • Brewer's Blackbird
    • Common Grackle
    • Boat-tailed Grackle
    • Great-tailed Grackle
  • Wood-Warblers
    • Black-and-white Warbler
    • Prothonotary Warbler
    • Orange-crowned Warbler
    • Lucy's Warbler
    • Nashville Warbler
    • Virginia's Warbler
    • MacGillivray's Warbler
    • Common Yellowthroat
    • Hooded Warbler
    • American Redstart
    • Northern Parula
    • Yellow Warbler
    • Palm Warbler
    • Pine Warbler
    • Yellow-rumped Warbler
    • Yellow-throated Warbler
    • Black-throated Gray Warbler
    • Townsend's Warbler
    • Wilson's Warbler
  • Cardinals, Grosbeaks, and Allies
    • Hepatic Tanager
    • Summer Tanager
    • Western Tanager
    • Northern Cardinal
    • Pyrrhuloxia
    • Rose-breasted Grosbeak
    • Black-headed Grosbeak
    • Blue Grosbeak
    • Lazuli Bunting
    • Indigo Bunting
    • Painted Bunting
    • Dickcissel

(African Collared-Dove and Mute Swan are unconfirmed.)

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6 hours ago, Zoroark said:

2022 Mid-Year Report

Month

Month
Total
YTD New Major Trips
January 163 163 +163 South Carolina & Georgia
February 82 178 +15  
March 155 232 +54 Southeast Arizona
April 116 252 +20  
May 155 278 +26  
June 121 306 +28 South Carolina

The year started off really strong with an almost immediate trip to South Carolina and Georgia. Winter in Clark County (Nevada) is already very strong, with 100+ species possible in a normal year, which was bolstered with many eastern species. In March, a trip to southeast Arizona filled in lots of species unique to the area. I spent the rest of spring going to the usual places (especially Corn Creek) to get lots of rarities. A summertime trip to South Carolina, while muggy, provided a good number of additional birds to pad the list.

My total so far for the year is 306 species, which I honestly think is pretty impressive for only taking three vacations, two of which were to the same location in different seasons, and none were a road trip (i.e. staying in a different place most nights).

Additional trips planned for this year:

  • Long Island + Rhode Island; includes boat trips with opportunities for pelagic species
  • Potentially, a trip to southern California and/or some of the national parks in Utah when it cools off
  • A few day trips, especially up the mountain

Major targets by area (in no particular order):

  • New York & Rhode Island
    • Black-capped Chickadee
    • Baltimore Oriole
    • Common Tern
    • Common Eider
    • Black Scoter
    • Piping Plover
    • Semipalmated Plover
    • Semipalmated Sandpiper
    • Glossy Ibis
    • Purple Martin
    • Short-billed Dowitcher
    • Ruddy Turnstone
    • Bobolink
    • American Black Duck
    • Wilson's Storm-Petrel (pelagic)
    • Cory's Shearwater (pelagic)
    • Great Shearwater (pelagic)
  • Nevada (definitely running out of easy targets)
    • Red-breasted Nuthatch
    • Clark's Nutcracker
    • Lesser Nighthawk
    • Bell's Vireo
    • Canyon Wren
    • Black-chinned Sparrow
    • Sagebrush Sparrow
    • Pinyon Jay
    • LeConte's Thrasher
  • California/Utah
    • Too many to list; I'll go through these more when I get confirmation of a trip later this year

Biggest misses (birds I won't get another chance at this year, mostly because I'm not going to Florida):

  • South Carolina
    • Clapper Rail
    • Black Skimmer
    • Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
    • Yellow-throated Vireo
    • Roseate Spoonbill
    • Gull-billed Tern
    • Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
  • Arizona (many of the birds I missed can be gotten in California)
    • Canyon Towhee
    • Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet
    • Rose-throated Becard (tried following a Rare Bird Alert)
    • Ruddy Ground Dove (tried following a Rare Bird Alert)

2022 mid-year list:

Nice! Sounds like you’ve been having no a great year. I might do a write up in your style later today. 

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12 minutes ago, IKLland said:

If/when this happens, PM me, as I can really help you out.

Will do! Someone in the group really wants to go to San Diego Zoo again, so that's a highly likely area. Depending on the route we take, a visit to the Salton Sea is possible. Around LA, I know Bolsa Chica is a must if we go through there. If we instead focus on the northern half of the state, Lassen Volcanic is a probable stop (not so much for birds, though). If we go to Utah, Bear River is a possibility. I wish I had unlimited funds and free time to take a month-long road trip. 😃

This is hypothetical, of course. Nothing is confirmed, especially when it would be.

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Month Month Total YTD New
Jan 194 194 194
Feb 142 203 9
Mar 195 247 44
Apr 309 408 161
May 214 432 24
Jun 206 518 86

January and February were pretty slow, barely even left the county during the first two months. I got most of the winter species that are local, but was fairly busy during those first two months and couldn't get out a lot. March picked up in terms of new species, mostly because of a weekend road trip down to Southern California and and the beginning of spring migration. April was definitely the best month of the year, as I went down to Texas for spring break. I was able to pick up a lot of new species and really increase the year (and life) lists down there. After that, the new species in may were mostly local pacific migrants which I still needed to pick up for the year. During June I went on a trip to Europe, which accounted for all 86 of the new species that month. 

 

I like @Zoroark's section about additional trips and targets, so I'll lay mine out below:

 

I have 3 main trips planned out for the rest of the year, each with some opportunities for lifers and year birds. 

  1. ABA Camp Colorado - I've never done an ABA camp, and I feel like it's something I have to do as a young birder.  There's a few lifers I'm hoping for while I'm up there (Boreal Owl, Ptarmagin, Brown-capped Rosy Finch), but it should also offer some opportunities for some nice year birds as well.
  2. Northeast Visiting Family - At the beginning of August I'm going to be going to multiple states in the northeast to visit some family members and look at some colleges while I'm out there. While it is a pretty slow time of year, I should hopefully get a few lifers (Big targets are Common Eider, Black Guillemot, Puffin, Mourning Warbler and Bicknel's Thrush). It should also provide an opportunity to clean up on some species I missed while in Texas.
  3. Panama - It seems like I'm going to have the opportunity to visit Panama over Christmas. I have tons of targets there, too much to explain here.  
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9 hours ago, Connor Cochrane said:

At the beginning of August I'm going to be going to multiple states in the northeast to visit some family members

I’m visiting family in NY at the beginning of August. Im hoping to get a lot of lifers, but not sure how much will be there at that time, and am also not sure how much birding, if any at all I’ll be able to get in. 

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