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Need help to verify Northern Harrier Juvenile


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I'm beginning to see the correct form as opposed to others like the Red Tailed Hawk. I'm pretty sure that this photo is of a Northern Harrier but wanted to be sure as markings are not always matching with pictures others show for this bird.
 

northern_harrier_juvenile_6507-Edit-Edit copy.jpg

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Red-tailed Hawk, think it's a juvenile. A northern harrier juvenile would be very orange underneath (males turn  gray, females stay brown on top, orange under with streaking). Nice Pic.

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15 minutes ago, MWM said:

Red-tailed Hawk, think it's a juvenile. A northern harrier juvenile would be very orange underneath (males turn  gray, females stay brown on top, orange under with streaking). Nice Pic.

Whew, I need to name these photos and I'm off practically every time. Thanks for your help with this so I don't pass on mis-information. Appreciation MWM. Moments later this guy appeared and I'm not going to mis-guess again but this bird has a more orange underneath so is this one a Northern Harrier Juvenile? 
 

Screen Shot 2022-01-27 at 10.25.28 PM.png

Edited by Ken Nielsen
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17 minutes ago, meghann said:

Yes, your new pic is a Northern Harrier. 🙂

Gracias and Thank You in every language... What a help this group is. This bird was a show off and danced around the field before taking off. Got lots of amazing photos of him. Thanks again!

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8 hours ago, Ken Nielsen said:

Whew, I need to name these photos and I'm off practically every time. Thanks for your help with this so I don't pass on mis-information. Appreciation MWM. Moments later this guy appeared and I'm not going to mis-guess again but this bird has a more orange underneath so is this one a Northern Harrier Juvenile? 
 

Screen Shot 2022-01-27 at 10.25.28 PM.png

Not a juvie, but an adult female. Juvies are VERY orange below!

see this post for an example:

 

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9 minutes ago, Aveschapines said:

Speak for yourself! Some of us could probably come up with at least 10 (and answer in 7!)

"Most of us"

I know German, Romanian, and of course Spanish, also I might recognize French, if I heard it.

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3 minutes ago, Kevin said:

"Most of us"

I know German, Romanian, and of course Spanish, also I might recognize French, if I heard it.

No idea how to say it in Romanian, but I can do Spanish, French, Italian, American Sign Language, Guatemalan Sign Language, K'iche', and English... and could answer and at least have a brief conversation. I could get out "thank you" in German, most Mayan languages, several sign languages, and perhaps a few others I'm not thinking of LOL!

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45 minutes ago, Aveschapines said:

No idea how to say it in Romanian, but I can do Spanish, French, Italian, American Sign Language, Guatemalan Sign Language, K'iche', and English... and could answer and at least have a brief conversation. I could get out "thank you" in German, most Mayan languages, several sign languages, and perhaps a few others I'm not thinking of LOL!

Cool! I didn't realize that sign language was not pretty much the same everywhere, so is it all similar, and just slightly different? Or is it different very different in different languages?

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1 hour ago, Kevin said:

Cool! I didn't realize that sign language was not pretty much the same everywhere, so is it all similar, and just slightly different? Or is it different very different in different languages?

Sign languages develop in exactly the same way as spoken languages; they emerge naturally wherever there are communities of Deaf people. They are different all over the world, just like spoken languages. There are also language families and patterns of similarity. For example, ASL (American Sign Language, used in most of the US and Canada) is similar to French Sign Language because a French person started the first residential school for Deaf children in the US and brought that language with him. There is also a lot of influence from a sign language that used to be spoken in a small town on Martha's Vineyard. The community had a genetic form of deafness, so a large percentage of people were born deaf there. Everyone grew up using both spoken English and sign language, and being Deaf did not pose any impediment to daily life because there were no communication issues. When the Deaf school opened a lot of children left the community to go there, and both brought their sign language to influence the French version used in the school, and also eventually introduced more genetic diversity and eventually there were no longer so many deaf people in the community.

On the other hand, both British and Australian sign language are VERY different from ASL; it's not related to the spoken language in each country. Here in Guatemala there are a lot of variations and in some cases completely different sign languages from one place to another. There is a good bit of influence from ASL, especially in recent years, just like English has influenced local Spanish a lot.

Deaf people do tend to be pretty good at picking up other signed languages. I have met Deaf people from Cuba, El Salvador, and other Latin American countries and you manage to communicate a little! Once a young Deaf Cuban man presented with a flower and made a sign that is similar to the Guatemalan sign for "old" and pointed to my face. I realized it surely meant something like "pretty" in Cuban signs! Also once when I was in Washington DC looking for a bus in Union Station, which I barely recognized from my childhood, I saw a woman standing by a bus stop and went to ask her for help. She indicated she was Deaf so I apologized and asked her in Guatemalan signs where my bus was. She asked another person nearby, also Deaf, who told me where I needed to go. I apologized for my foreign signs and explained that I live in Guatemala, and she said that's OK, I'm Australian! Then I noticed the sign where they were waiting - it was the stop for the shuttle bus to Gallaudet, the university for Deaf people in DC 😄

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One of my kids (the second of the four) did ASL as her "foreign language" for high school. It's all fascinating. One of her ideas was becoming an interpreter (especially with there being such a shortage) but with the pandemic and everything, has kind of fallen off the wagon. Now who knows.

Anyway, I'm sitting here counting, and I know "thank you" in more languages than I thought. At least 6.

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My sister and mom do a lot of ASL, and my mom does a bit of ASL with her childcare kids. I've picked up on little things. 

I can say "Thank You" in 6 languages, but I am only fluent in English. I can hold my own in French, but I am nowhere near fluent.

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2 hours ago, Aveschapines said:

But can you write "thank you" in all of those languages?

Well, I can program them to display a 'Thank you' text string; does that count?

2 hours ago, Aveschapines said:

Much of it, yes! It's fascinating 😄

Learning a language has paralyzed me since my freshman year of high school.  I failed college Spanish at least twice and French once.  It's like having to memorize multiplication tables but without any logical underpinnings.  I was finally reduced to looking at a 4" stack of flash cards through every waking monent for four months.  I'd likely turn down a trip to a non-English-speaking country if you gave it to me.

Now ask me how I feel about cursive writing ...

Edited by Charlie Spencer
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5 hours ago, Colton V said:

Do y'all just learn new languages in your free time??

I think most of the reason I know Thank You in so many languages just by picking it up from movies. I took one year of Spanish in high school, but also grew up in Texas, and you pick up a minimal amount by osmosis from living there. I know just enough to get myself in trouble, lol.

I'm not fluent in anything but English.

6 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

I can write HTML, SQL, PowerShell, and if I absolutely have to, COBOL.

My dad can do that stuff, too. He's been a programmer since the early 80s. I don't even know how many tech languages he knows. (But like you, don't think he does well with any people languages.)

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On 1/28/2022 at 9:09 AM, Kevin said:

Flattering, but not really necessary, most of us only know thank you in two or three languages!

Let's see, I know thank you in German, Mandarin Chinese, English, Japanese, French, Spanish, Dutch, Hindi, and Arabic, and I used to know it in Vietnamese and Khmer, but I forgot now. 

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1 hour ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

Let's see, I know thank you in German, Mandarin Chinese, English, Japanese, French, Spanish, Dutch, Hindi, and Arabic, and I used to know it in Vietnamese and Khmer, but I forgot now. 

Oh yeah, that reminded me that I know it in Chinese and Japanese. So now I'm at 8 if you count English, lol. English, French, Italian, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, ASL, and German.

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