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This is a question of my judgement/ID skills...  (one of these days I need to REALLY actually study these things)

Had a hawk fly a few days ago. Legs looked a little skinny but not a tiny bird(I know the tree it was sitting on quite well) so I knew it wasn't ssha. Looked a little too bulky to be an accipiter at all... tail too short as well. Definitely not RTHA, RSHA is common here but, didn't look right. The young bird streaks seemed to be going away and some more color coming in that didn't match rsha or coha... and, it's thicker up high more like a bib? so, I was thinking broad-winged?
Those are easier for me to ID in flight looking for the thick tail bands and trailing dark outline to the wings...  I could only think broad-winged at that point so I think I left it as hawk sp.  but a little later I walked down the street and, there was a broad-winged... so it may have been the same bird.
Is my thinking/analyzing of this bird not too bad?

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Thanks. Sometimes I feel like I'm learning a little... 🙂 

Forgot to add... other than the shape being wrong for an accipiter... this bird sat in a tree for a while with the songbirds not being too bothered. If it were an accipiter my yard would have been quiet and the birds near it would have either flown or been frozen.

 

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7 hours ago, millipede said:

this bird sat in a tree for a while with the songbirds not being too bothered. If it were an accipiter my yard would have been quiet and the birds near it would have either flown or been frozen.

Broad-winged Hawks are more of a generalist than accipiters. But Broad-winged Hawks definitely will take small songbirds if they get the chance! They'll also eat rodents as well as lots of frogs and snakes. On their breeding grounds in the north country they love hunting in the open areas around bogs, beaver ponds, and other bodies of water. Because frogs and snakes will sit out and sun themselves in those open areas.

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