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ID Help please- Northern California Riparian Area


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Any other angles of photos on the bird? One thing I do is compare where the ends of the longest primaries are to where the undertail coverts end. The primaries usually reach just beyond the undertail coverts on a Hammond's and usually the primaries fall just short of the end of the undertail coverts on a Dusky. But that's pretty dependent on posture and honestly I'm not even sure if it's true or reliable in any way just something I've noticed

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3 hours ago, AlexHenry said:

The primaries usually reach just beyond the undertail coverts on a Hammond's and usually the primaries fall just short of the end of the undertail coverts on a Dusky.

Backed up by the Sibley guide which also says Hammond's has a longer primary projection than Dusky. Good enough for an ID or do they vary too much? I can't remember if this has been used for Hammond's/Dusky previously but routinely for other flycatcher comparisons.

On this bird (with a normal posture) it looks like the primaries end at or just before the end of the UnTC, so Dusky?

However I'm not sure if the PP would be called long or medium (more towards medium I think).

Just trying to get myself back into flycatcher mode.

 

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I’m having a hard time seeing this as anything other than a Hammond’s. The primaries are on the short-ish side of HAFL but within range for the species, the throat is gray and the bill is REALLY short. Although I understand that many of these factors depend on posture and position of the observer in relation to the bird, it reads as a HAFL to me.

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13 minutes ago, IKLland said:

Length of primary projection, like you and Alex Henry said. I have no experience here, and didn’t realize how much that depends on posture. Sorry. 

No need to apologize. I was simply inquiring as to the reasons you thought it may have been one species over the other.

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