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3 minutes ago, DLecy said:

Not sure exactly which sound you are seeking an ID on, but the main sound I hear in the recording seems good for Marsh Wren, not a Clapper/King Rail.

I was thinking Sedge Wren, but you are probably right, I am not an expert.

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1 minute ago, Tanager 101 said:

I was thinking Sedge Wren, but you are probably right, I am not an expert.

Marsh Wrens inhabit some parts of the Gulf Coast year round, whereas Sedge Wrens only overwinter along the Gulf Coast. So, I said MAWR simply due to time of year and the fact that there is only a single record for SEWR at this particular location, all time.

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1 minute ago, DLecy said:

Marsh Wrens inhabit some parts of the Gulf Coast year round, whereas Sedge Wrens only overwinter along the Gulf Coast. So, I said MAWR simply due to time of year and the fact that there is only a single record for SEWR at this particular location, all time.

Yeah I didn't look at any of that stuff. I just listened to it and was like it sounds more like a sedge to me then a Marsh. So yeah you're most likely right.

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On 6/25/2022 at 1:15 PM, DLecy said:

Not sure exactly which sound you are seeking an ID on, but the main sound I hear in the recording seems good for Marsh Wren, not a Clapper/King Rail.

The sound that begins around 16s. 

In the field it sounded like the Kek series of a rail sp., albeit somewhat muted.  I observed for 7 or 8 minutes and there was zero movement in the grassy area from which the sound emanated.  Would that be out of character for a wren?    In my limited experience, the wren spp.  I have first noted by ear were pretty lively and eventually revealed themselves (if only fleetingly). 

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1 hour ago, floraphile said:

The sound that begins around 16s. 

In the field it sounded like the Kek series of a rail sp., albeit somewhat muted.  I observed for 7 or 8 minutes and there was zero movement in the grassy area from which the sound emanated.  Would that be out of character for a wren?    In my limited experience, the wren spp.  I have first noted by ear were pretty lively and eventually revealed themselves (if only fleetingly). 

The "kek" series of the two different rail species you are considering are both notably louder, slightly more spaced out and, this important...much lower. If you compare with known calls on Macaulay and look at the spectrogram, this is evident. I'm almost positive that this is a Marsh Wren.

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On 6/27/2022 at 2:37 PM, DLecy said:

The "kek" series of the two different rail species you are considering are both notably louder, slightly more spaced out and, this important...much lower. If you compare with known calls on Macaulay and look at the spectrogram, this is evident. I'm almost positive that this is a Marsh Wren.

You are probably right. 

Would Common Gallinule even be a consideration? That is what I thought in the field (it was not nearly loud enough for a Clapper), but I sent it to a more experienced birder and he thought Clapper/King, but he did include the disclaimer--without further clarification--"if there was a volume issue" with the recording.  I will also ask him about Marsh Wren.  

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32 minutes ago, floraphile said:

You are probably right. 

Would Common Gallinule even be a consideration? That is what I thought in the field (it was not nearly loud enough for a Clapper), but I sent it to a more experienced birder and he thought Clapper/King, but he did include the disclaimer--without further clarification--"if there was a volume issue" with the recording.  I will also ask him about Marsh Wren.  

This doesn't sound like any of the vocalizations I have ever heard from a Common Gallinule. Boy, you must really not like Marsh Wrens. 😉

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1 minute ago, DLecy said:

This doesn't sound like any of the vocalizations I have ever heard from a Common Gallinule. Boy, you must really not like Marsh Wrens. 😉

 LOL!  Just trying to learn!  A college physics professor frquently used the adage that "The best way to learn something is to first get it wrong."  I learned quite a lot in Phyics.

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