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eBird - Additional Taxa, new location good or bad?


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Not sure if this has been discussed or is of interest.

Additional Taxa now appear at the bottom of a hotspot overview. I can understand the rationale but it was sometimes useful for someone arriving a day or so after to easily see a recent potential sighting and take more notice. Just a thought.

 

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Posted (edited)
48 minutes ago, DLecy said:

what "slash" or "spuh" would you be interested in chasing or going to see

Definitely not chasing or even going to see - more a general interest as to what may be around when visiting a location.

Perhaps rail/crake, dowitcher, or even falcon (I spotted a Peregrine today and luckily got a photo to confirm ID, but may have had to report as falcon sp.).

I prefer the cleaner look and just wondered about initial reactions.

PS. I often include a sp. in my reports in the hope that someone else following may get a better view.

 

Edited by RobinHood
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2 hours ago, RobinHood said:

Definitely not chasing or even going to see - more a general interest as to what may be around when visiting a location.

Perhaps rail/crake, dowitcher, or even falcon (I spotted a Peregrine today and luckily got a photo to confirm ID, but may have had to report as falcon sp.).

I prefer the cleaner look and just wondered about initial reactions.

PS. I often include a sp. in my reports in the hope that someone else following may get a better view.

 

Got it. I was just curious. I do prefer the cleaner look.

Good on you for not always trying to ID a bird to species. It’s commendable when observers do that from time to time.

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48 minutes ago, Charlie Spencer said:

I like it.  There's a hotspot that only a couple of us hit regularly, and I'm tired of my inability to identify sparrows and warblers being prominently displayed!

I always have a great time identifying sparrows and warblers!

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I forgot to mention that currently (may change):

Exotic: Escapee - complete information provided ie. number of sightings, time of year, top photos etc.

Hybrids - just info for the last sighting.

Additional Taxa - just info for the last sighting.

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I would've preferred the option of showing the previous sorting method, purely by date.

19 hours ago, DLecy said:

Good on you for not always trying to ID a bird to species. It’s commendable when observers do that from time to time.

Out here, during spring/fall migration, you're often not getting much further than "Empidonax sp." if you don't get a good look and don't hear a call, especially if you're going by a photo after the fact. We've got six that regularly occur, plus the easy-to-mistake Western Wood-Pewee and Olive-Sided Flycatcher.

From my visits out east, I've learned "crow sp." is a very common addition to many lists.

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26 minutes ago, Zoroark said:

Out here, during spring/fall migration, you're often not getting much further than "Empidonax sp." if you don't get a good look and don't hear a call, especially if you're going by a photo after the fact. We've got six that regularly occur, plus the easy-to-mistake Western Wood-Pewee and Olive-Sided Flycatcher.

Yes, in the west during fall migration "Empidonax sp." is a very responsible method for sorting flycatchers as they are often silent that time of year. Even all presumed Pac-slope Flycatchers get the "Western" Pac-slope/Cordilleran treatment in coastal CA during fall months. 

Right now in my county we are trying to figure out a good approach to the annual Allen's/Rufous debate, but many/most birds should responsibly be left as a slash.

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@DLecy I often wonder how bad it must be for Texans to differentiate extremely similar eastern and western species, which in most of the rest of the country can be identified purely by range, and many of which were once conspecific. Examples include the meadowlarks (of which there are now three), grackles, towhees, wood-pewees, ibises, ravens...

Edited by Zoroark
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