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Kevin

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/14/2022 at 11:56 AM, Charlie Spencer said:

What you really have to love is a guy with a 700+ life list who's still posting photos of Northern Flickers, Song Sparrows, and Green Herons.

Or the guy who does have 528 in his county, is an ebird reviewer, pretty much watched birds for a living,  ... and yet proudly puts up an ebird profile picture of him holding a comically small fish ?

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This makes me curious about what counties (not entire states—California is huge!) in the US have the most birds sighted on eBird.

On 10/14/2022 at 11:56 AM, Charlie Spencer said:

What you really have to love is a guy with a 700+ life list who's still posting photos of Northern Flickers, Song Sparrows, and Green Herons.

I'll be honest, most of my photography these days is opportunistic. Unless I'm looking at a species that I haven't seen before or need to identify a species by zooming in later, I don't snap the shutter as much. However, if I see perfect lighting with no obstructions on a common bird that fills the frame, I'll definitely take a few shots.

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6 minutes ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Do you mean most species or most total counted individual birds?

Most species. You'd probably have to go here, click each state, then click "Counties," and compare the top ones. Just a quick glance shows a lot in southern California and Texas. Then color in one of those county maps (the ones often seen in political polls) like the ones on eBird profiles.

I'm sure it's easy to do programmatically with the eBird API, but I'd probably spend more time fighting with the mapping tool than actually enjoying the map it produced.

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19 minutes ago, Zoroark said:

Most species. You'd probably have to go here, click each state, then click "Counties," and compare the top ones. Just a quick glance shows a lot in southern California and Texas. Then color in one of those county maps (the ones often seen in political polls) like the ones on eBird profiles.

I'm sure it's easy to do programmatically with the eBird API, but I'd probably spend more time fighting with the mapping tool than actually enjoying the map it produced.

I think someone asked this before and @neilpa figured it out. Almost all the top counties are in California though.

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Been in Tennessee for about a year, and I’m 2nd in my county for the year (168), and 15th all time(183)! We have several active birders in the county, and I consider this county at a middle level for how birded it is. Certainly more than some surrounding counties, but wayyyyy less than others. 

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21 hours ago, Zoroark said:

Most species. You'd probably have to go here, click each state, then click "Counties," and compare the top ones. Just a quick glance shows a lot in southern California and Texas. Then color in one of those county maps (the ones often seen in political polls) like the ones on eBird profiles.

I'm sure it's easy to do programmatically with the eBird API, but I'd probably spend more time fighting with the mapping tool than actually enjoying the map it produced.

Los Angeles County has more species than every state but California (obviously), Texas and Florida.  

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I'm also 19th in my county this year and 57th all-time. There are some very competitive people near the top. I'm #1 this year in Bamberg, South Carolina, though.

17 hours ago, Birds are cool said:

Thanks. I wish that more people birded here. I only know of a couple residents here, and my county does not have many hotspots.

To be fair, Georgia is the state with the second most number of counties, behind Texas.

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On 10/24/2022 at 9:41 AM, Connor Cochrane said:

I think someone asked this before and @neilpa figured it out. Almost all the top counties are in California though.

@Zoroark Here's the google sheet with all the data. The spreadsheet really pushes the limits of what google sheets can handle. I remember running into a bunch of errors when trying to manipulate it further. You'd probably have better luck exporting and slicing/dicing in Excel. The "results" tab is the complete list of every species seen per-county, the other two sum over that sheet.

Looks like it's based on data I pulled from eBird in January 2021. I may still have the scripts I used to generate this lying around somewhere if you're interested.

Edited by neilpa
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@neilpa Neat, thanks! Oh wow, I didn't expect Clark, Nevada to be 30th. I'm not surprised the entire top 10 are dominated by counties in California. It also does confirm a few suspicions, like southern Arizona being one of the best places in the country for unique birds.

Edit: Oh wow, the species table is even more interesting.

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  • 10 months later...
2 hours ago, Kevin said:

This thing has been buried for nearly a year, why bring it up now?

Because I was looking to see if there’s any threads about this topic and found two threads for the sane thing. I also wanted to bring the thread back so we can update about our lists. 

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