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2023 Year Lists


Zoroark

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2 minutes ago, Peromyscus said:

Somewhat related: In early 2004, my wife and I were planning for a 5-day trip to Charleston, SC, driving from Maryland. In part because of a wintering Yellow-billed Loon a little ways south of Atlanta, Georgia, the trip became a 9-day trip driving to Miami and birding the Everglades after stops for the loon and for Florida Scrub-Jay. We never went to Charleston that year, though we have been since.

You have a birder wife? I could totally see myself doing that… 

Edited by Snake Fingers
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7 minutes ago, Peromyscus said:

Somewhat related: In early 2004, my wife and I were planning for a 5-day trip to Charleston, SC, driving from Maryland. In part because of a wintering Yellow-billed Loon a little ways south of Atlanta, Georgia, the trip became a 9-day trip driving to Miami and birding the Everglades after stops for the loon and for Florida Scrub-Jay. We never went to Charleston that year, though we have been since.

My dad is getting skeptical that I’m even in school… 😂 

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9 minutes ago, Avery said:

My dad is getting skeptical that I’m even in school… 😂 

I hear you. I was a little like that when I was in college. I sometimes drove the 90 miles from college back home in the DC area on a Friday, then on Saturday got up super early and drove to coastal Delaware or Maryland for the day to watch birds.

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43 minutes ago, Snake Fingers said:

You have a birder wife? I could totally see myself doing that… 

It was so much fun. The worst part was asking my boss for a few extra days off to accomodate the longer trip fairly close to the start.

Edited by Peromyscus
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During break and a visit to the eastern U.P, I got my list up to 78 (this time last year it was in the mid 50s). I probably won't increase that number much, now since I'm in the frozen north and school starts tomorrow. Common Merganser and Bufflehead are probably the most likely new yearbirds now, unless I get lucky and find a Black-backed Woodpecker or something.

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1 hour ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Casual question.  Look back at your annual totals for the last few years.  Roughly what percentage of your annual total did you record in January?

My January's have averaged 20% of my annual total over the last five years.

Last year I saw 74 out of the 208 species (all of them fairly close to home) in January, so that's 36%. Other recent years have roughly the same percentage, or lower.

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2 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Casual question.  Look back at your annual totals for the last few years.  Roughly what percentage of your annual total did you record in January?

My January's have averaged 20% of my annual total over the last five years.

Over the past few years, my January total has been almost 50% of the species I see each year. Here in the Sacramento area it is pretty easy to get close to 200 species in January as long as you travel to the coast once or twice. I typically finish the year between 370 and 400 species. 

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6 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Casual question.  Look back at your annual totals for the last few years.  Roughly what percentage of your annual total did you record in January?

My January's have averaged 20% of my annual total over the last five years.

If I start the year somewhere tropical, usually about 30-40%, last year was 39%. 
If I don’t, 10-15%. 
There’s definitely not too much happening here in January (the whole province is still under 100 species this year) but, for me anyways, I usually have no problem waiting a few months to step into high gear as the weather is generally nicer and there’s more species to see. 90% of the birds that are here now are also here every other month of the year so no real rush. 

I don’t think I’ve ever made it above 30 species in January for my county 🤔

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Regarding @Charlie Spencer's question, this is only my third year of serious birding, so that's all the data I have.

In 2021, I found 102 species in January without leaving Clark County, out of 210 birds in the county (49% in Jan) and 275 across the US (37% in Jan) in the year.

In 2022, I found 166 species in January, out of 368 in the year, so I found 45% of them in January. For just Clark County, I found 108 in January, out of 227 in the year, so I found 48% of them in January.

So far in 2023, I'm at 94 and have only had three days of actual birding without leaving the county.

It's safe to say Clark County has great winter birding. 🙂

Edited by Zoroark
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7 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Casual question.  Look back at your annual totals for the last few years.  Roughly what percentage of your annual total did you record in January?

My January's have averaged 20% of my annual total over the last five years.

County only, 22.3%.  I don't have my other totals in spreadsheet, just county.  I have basically only been out of the immediate area once, and that January it was 35.7% of that year.  

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22 hours ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Casual question.  Look back at your annual totals for the last few years.  Roughly what percentage of your annual total did you record in January?

My January's have averaged 20% of my annual total over the last five years.

About 45% last year for me. 

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27 minutes ago, Connor Cochrane said:

Find any? I had two right at my school today. 

No, I think that Sherman was probably a bit to far inland. I did have a couple birds in flight get away from me that I felt were probably REPH, but the rain was coming down really hard at the time, the viewing conditions were terrible, and I couldn't call them with what I saw given their rarity in Sacramento. They were very fluttery shorebirds whatever they were. 

Edited by Aidan B
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