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Illinois - Long-eared Owl?


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Thanks.  My post on ebird of the owl gets a 'sensitive' notice:

"Public information for Sensitive Species is restricted due to potential harmful impact to these birds. Site-specific information is visible only to the observer and eBird reviewer(s) for the region."  "We encourage you not to share specific location information about this sighting via social media, public websites, or email listservs."

So my owl post and photo remains hidden from non-ebird viewers.  I think that the owl was resting at 4-5 feet above ground was the reason.

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8 minutes ago, rayh said:

Thanks.  My post on ebird of the owl gets a 'sensitive' notice:

"Public information for Sensitive Species is restricted due to potential harmful impact to these birds. Site-specific information is visible only to the observer and eBird reviewer(s) for the region."  "We encourage you not to share specific location information about this sighting via social media, public websites, or email listservs."

So my owl post and photo remains hidden from non-ebird viewers.  I think that the owl was resting at 4-5 feet above ground was the reason.

There have been instances of owls dying from exhaustion because so many birders and photographers want to see them and won’t leave them alone. eBird automatically hides the exact location of certain species to prevent this from happening. 

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2 hours ago, rayh said:

That makes sense.  However, the Northern Saw-whet Owl was nearby, about 10 feet from the Long-eared which eBird didn't hide that information (plus photos) from viewers.

Honestly I think it should be, as photographers love to hound them. Maybe it’s because their populations are still relatively high. 

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2 hours ago, rayh said:

So my owl post and photo remains hidden from non-ebird viewers.  I think that the owl was resting at 4-5 feet above ground was the reason.

Your photos are not hidden. The exact location of the sighting does not appear in eBird aside from the grid level. In a nutshell, you can’t search in detail for this species under the species map in eBird. Your photos do appear in the searchable photo database, but without a specific location beyond the county where the sighting took place.

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11 hours ago, DLecy said:

The exact location of the sighting does not appear in eBird aside from the grid level. In a nutshell, you can’t search in detail for this species under the species map in eBird.

Interesting.  Would someone tell me if they can see the location of a Great Horned on this checklist?

https://ebird.org/checklist/S93931897

Thanks.

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2 minutes ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Interesting.  Would someone tell me if they can see the location of a Great Horned on this checklist?

https://ebird.org/checklist/S93931897

Thanks.

Yes, since Great Horned Owl isn’t a sensitive species. Great Gray, Northern Hawk-Owl, Gyrfalcon, and now Long-eared owl are all listed as Sensitive on eBird, as well as many more. The usual reasoning is due to low populations and/or sensitivity to disturbance. Gyrfalcons have low population numbers, and are sensitive to being nest raided by falconers. 

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Just now, Avery said:

Yes, since Great Horned Owl isn’t a sensitive species. Great Gray, Northern Hawk-Owl, Gyrfalcon, and now Long-eared owl are all listed as Sensitive on eBird, as well as many more. The usual reasoning is due to low populations and/or sensitivity to disturbance. Gyrfalcons have low population numbers, and are sensitive to being nest raided by falconers. 

It can also be affected by which population you’re talking about. Greater Prairie-Chicken populations in Illinois are listed as sensitive, while the western and apparently the Texas populations aren’t, since you can see exact points and lists. Weird, since Atwater’s is critically endangered… Black Rails are another example. 

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